Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to philosophy as the speculative attempt to present a systematic and complete view of all reality. Students will be introduced to the writings of seminal philosophers as well as to the role of logic and forms of argumentation.

TCCN: PHIL 1301

PHIL 2301 Introduction to Logic

A study of the methods and principles of correct reasoning, both deductive and inductive; fallacies, and arguments together with analysis of the proposition.

PHIL 2306 Introduction to Ethics

An introduction to the elements of moral philosophy including, but not limited to, the following issues: What is morality?; Cultural and Moral Relativism; Does Morality depend on Religion?; Ethical Egoism; Deontology, including Kant's Categorical Imperative and Respect for Reasons; The Idea of a Social Contract; and The Ethics of Virtue.

TCCN: PHIL 2306

PHIL 3302 Philosophy of Law

An examination and evaluation of some basic practices and principles of Anglo-American law. The course will focus on such problems as: the nature and extent of legal liability, strict liability statutes, "Good Samaritan" laws, the law of criminal attempts, the enforcement of community moral standards, the obligation to obey the law, the justification of punishment and capital punishment, civil obedience, and affirmative action and reverse discrimination. We will examine prominent legal cases and their underlying principles, but the emphasis will be on the philosophical analysis and evaluation of the law in these areas. Readings will be drawn from both classical and contemporary sources. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary

PHIL 3304 Contemporary Moral Issues

Philosophical examination of selected moral problems arising out of contemporary society. Some of the moral problems we will explore are: abortion, euthanasia, poverty and hunger, war, animal rights, human cloning, and other biomedical issues.

PHIL 3316 Classical Renaisn. Philosophy

This course will cover the major philosophers from the Hellenistic and Roman philosophy of antiquity beginning circa 600 B.C.E. to the significant texts of the seventeenth-century in courses of study like theology, metaphysics, epistemology, moral psychology, aesthetics, and the utopian project of the West. Possible philosophers include such thinkers as the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Berkeley, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Leibniz, Bacon, and Locke. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

PHIL 3317 The Age of Reason

This course covers the major developments in philosophical thought from the 18th century through to the major thinkers of today. It deals with “modern” and “postmodern” topics such as the limits of science, political epistemology, aesthetics, hermeneutics, post-structuralism, critical theory, deconstruction, contemporary Marxist strategies, semiotics, cultural studies, gender studies, race theory, humantechnological interplay, and other issues. The course can include the works of such thinkers as Hume, Rousseau, Voltaire, Emerson, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Freud, Lacan, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Wittgenstein, Lyotard, Derrida, Foucault, Spivak, Barthes, and many others. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

PHIL 3321 Philosophy of Religion

This course is an introduction to the academic study of religion. The study of religion may include theological examinations of the questions about god (its existence, nature, our ability to know it, etc.) or surveys of diverse religions from around the world such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and many others. These studies may also include the sub-groups or sects found within each of these religions. In addition, the course can include studies of indigenous or oral religious traditions as well. While the course can cover some of the history, biographies, and customs within these religions, its true focus will be the philosophical theories and arguments behind these worldviews and/or the questions pertaining to the existence and nature of a spiritual life. While there may be comparison between these religions, an appreciation for the unique cultural identity of each will be emphasized. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

PHIL 3341 Great Books: Classical to Ren

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition before the Renaissance, from Greco-Roman period to Renaissance. Classics such as Plato's Republic, Plutarch's Lives, Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, Dante's Divine Comedy may be read. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3341, and PSCI 3341)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

PHIL 3342 Great Books: Renaissance-Pres

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition since the Renaissance, from Cervantes to the present. Classics such as de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Wollstonecrafts' A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Nietzsche's The Uses and Abuses of History, Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" may be read. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3342, and PSCI 3342)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

PHIL 4302 Philosophy in Literature

Formulation and critical analysis of philosophical ideas in selected literary works. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4302)

PHIL 4310 Great Thinkers

This course involves the critical analysis of a specified philosopher’s ideas over the course of his or her career through the examination of selected works. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite ENGL 1302.

PHIL 4380 Philosophy in Literature

Formulation and critical analysis of philosophical ideas in selected literary works. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4380)

Prerequisites: 2000 or 3000 level English or Philosophy course with a grade of C or better.

PHIL 4388 Existentialism

A study of the nature of human existence and experience in the philosophies of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Miguel de Unamuno, Kafka, Ortega y Gasset, Sartre, and Camus. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4388)

Prerequisites: 3000-level English or 2000- or 3000-level Philosophy course with a grade of “C” or better.