Humanities

ARAB 1311 Beginning Arabic I

In this course students will acquire fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures and culture.

TCCN: ARAB 1411

ARAB 1312 Beginning Arabic II

A continuation of ARAB 1311, students will acquire additional skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

Prerequisites: ARAB 1311 or consent of instructor.

TCCN: ARAB 1412

ARAB 1620 Beginning Arabic

An intensive beginning Arabic course. Six semester hours plus one hour lab. In this course students will acquire fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Includes basic vocabular, grammatical structures, and culture. Six semester hours plus one hour lab (Cross-listed with ARAB 1311 and ARAB 1312).

ENGL 1301 English Composition I

The goal of this course is to develop students' expository and analytical writing skills by guiding them through the multiple stages of the writing process and by creating an awareness of authorial voice, audience, purpose, and occasion. Students will also employ critical thinking and reading skills in the evaluation of selected readings designed to further emphasize the writing process. This course will provide an introduction to writing the documented essay, to acquiring information literacy skills, and to evaluating both printed and electronic sources. To earn credit, this course must be completed with a "C" or better. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: DENG 0370, a satisfactory score on standard assessment test, or exemption from any TSI test.

TCCN: ENGL 1301

ENGL 1302 English Composition II

This course offers a continuation of the expository and analytical writing skills developed in English 1301 and introduces the principles of argumentation and more extensive interpretation of selected readings. Students will again be engaged in all steps of the writing process, generating argumentative essays based on thoughtful analysis and discussion of reading assignments. In addition, students will be guided through the steps of more sophisticated research writing techniques, information literacy skills, and evaluation of primary and secondary sources, culminating in a series of essay length research projects. To earn credit, this course must be completed with a "C" or better. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301.

TCCN: ENGL 1302

ENGL 2307 Intro to Creative Writing

This introductory course is designed to give students the opportunity to explore their abilities and interests in a variety of genres. The course will emphasize the aesthetic demands of different genres through formal study of required readings and especially through first-hand experience of writing exercises. Students will write in at least two of the following genres: poetry, short fiction, drama, screenwriting, and non-fiction.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better.

TCCN: ENGL 2307

ENGL 2311 Technical Communication-WIN

This course focuses upon the analysis and application of oral, written, and visual communication principles and practices, including strategies for interpersonal communication, effective teamwork, public speaking, and technical writing. Participants will develop written, oral, and visual components of technical communication, which include specialized processes, methods, and/or specialized knowledge sets belonging to any number of disciplines, including, but not limited to, social sciences, applied or industrial sciences, mass media, and engineering. Students will practice individual and collaborative composing processes in the creation of ethical and effective communication.

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course, or satisfactory completion of ENGL 1301 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent course if enrolled in a baccalaureate program with the School of Engineering.

TCCN: ENGL 2311

ENGL 2322 British Lit Through Neoclass

A study of notable developments, works, and authors in the literature of Britain through Neoclassicism. Substantial writing required. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2322

ENGL 2323 British Lit: Romantics-Pres

A study of notable developments, works, and authors in the literature of Britain through Neoclassicism. Substantial writing required. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2323

ENGL 2327 American Lit to the Civil War

Covers major literary development, authors, and works in American literature through the Civil War. Substantial writing required. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2327

ENGL 2328 American Lit: Civil War-Pres

Introduces notable authors such as Whitman, Twain, Dickinson, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, O'Neill, Frost, Eliot, Brooks, Wright, etc. as well as evolutions in literary taste and practices. Substantial writing required. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2328

ENGL 2332 Survey of World Lit to 1650

Familiarizes the student with several non-English literary traditions and gives them an understanding of the inter-relatedness of cultures and civilizations. Substantial writing required. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2332

ENGL 2333 Survey of World Lit Since 1650

A study of several non-European literary traditions in the past three centuries, including African, Indian, Persian, Chinese, and Japanese. Substantial writing required. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2333

ENGL 2365 Literature and Film

This course explores how film and literature interact. Novels, short stories and plays are analyzed in relation to film versions of the same works in order to gain an understanding of the possibilities—and problems—involved in adapting them to film.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent course.

TCCN: ENGL 2342

ENGL 3301 Advanced Composition-WIN

Provides opportunities to expand writing skills by experimenting with a variety of genres and rhetorical conventions. This course will involve non-literary, multiple genre textual analysis as a source for writing assignments and will refine students' sense of authorial voice and style.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3302 Writing in the Disciplines-WIN

Provides opportunities for students to write in various disciplinary areas, including, but not limited to, Fine and Performing Arts, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Humanities. Students engage in the writing process and compose a number of writing projects that meet the expectations of a given genre and discipline, including, but not limited to visual analysis, critical analysis, and argument-synthesis. Research and critical reading, writing, and thinking are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3307 Special Top Non-Fic Prose Writ

Exploration of and practicum in the genre of nonfiction prose. Guided by analysis of audience, technique, and style and critical reading of the nonfiction prose of established authors, as well as by essays on creative nonfiction writing, students will practice writing about culture, family, personal identity, or significant life events with the goal of producing essays that are interesting, pertinent, and meaningful to a broad selection of readers. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3311 General Linguistics

A study of the linguistic nature of language, including general language principles, phonetics, semantics, syntax, and socio-linguistics. May be taken by a student who has taken ENGL 4309.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3320 The Middle Ages

A study of selected authors, historical periods, literary movements, genres, themes, or cultural issues in the literature of the Middle Ages.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3321 The 16th Century

A study of the literature from Henry VII’s ascension to the throne up through Elizabeth I’s reign. The course examines cultural, social, and political developments influencing the writers under study.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3322 The 17th Century

A study of British Literature from the end of Elizabeth I’s reign through the end of the seventeenth century. The course examines cultural, social, and political developments influencing the writers under study.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3323 The Restoration & 18th Cent

A study of the drama, poetry, and prose of the Restoration and the eighteenth century. The course examines cultural, social, and political developments influencing the writers under study. Authors may include Congreve, Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Samuel Johnson.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3324 19th Cent Brit. Lit: Romantics

A study of the poetry and fictional and/or non-fictional prose of the “Romantic” period in British Literature (roughly 1785-1830). The course examines cultural, social, and political developments influencing the writers under study. Authors may include Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, and Wollstonecraft.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3325 19th Century Lit: Victorians

A study of the poetry and prose of the Victorian age. The course examines cultural, social, and political developments influencing the writers under study. Authors may include Dickens, the Bronte sisters, the Rossettis, Tennyson, George Eliot, Ruskin, Gaskell, Arnold, Darwin, and Oscar Wilde.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3326 British Lit from 1900 to WWII

A study of British literature from the first forty years of the twentieth century, including the literary, social, and political movements that influenced it. Authors may include Conrad, Forster, Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce, Shaw, Hardy, Yeats, and the World War I poets.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or instructor’s consent.

ENGL 3327 British Lit from WWII to Pres

A study of the trajectory of British literature from the outbreak of World War II to today, including the end of the British Empire and the increased expansion and diversification of the literary canon. Authors may include Beckett, the Amises, Lessing, Achebe, Dylan Thomas, Larkin, Ishigur, and Zadie Smith.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or instructor’s consent.

ENGL 3330 Early American Literature

A study of American literature from its beginning to 1836. Though the course will emphasize English language writings of the Colonial, Pre-Revolutionary, and Early Republican periods, it will also feature in translations works from the Native American oral tradition and from the Spanish and French exploration and colonization of North America.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3331 Late 19th Century American Lit

A study of American literature from the Civil War to the beginning of World War I, featuring the emergence of American humor and realism. Authors may include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Chopin, Wharton, and Robinson.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3332 Early 20th Century American Lt

A study of American literature from the end of World War I to the end of World War II. Readings will include such writers as Stein, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Pound, Eliot, Barnes, Cather, Wharton, Hughes, O'Neill, Yezierska, Steinbeck, Hurston, and Dos Passos.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3333 Late 20th Century American Lt

A study of American literature from World War II to the present. Readings may include selections from literary movements and schools as well as such central figures as Tennessee Williams, Flannery O'Connor, Arthur Miller, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Allen Ginsberg, Thomas Pynchon, and Toni Morrison.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3340 Literature in English

A study of the literature of any era that is written in English but does not originate in the United States or its territories or in England itself. Areas of study may include literature of the Commonwealth nations (e.g., Australia, Canada), of former British colonies (e.g., India, Ireland), and of English-speaking peoples in the Caribbean, Africa, and the Americas. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3341 Great Books: Classical to Ren

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition before the Renaissance, from Greco-Roman period to Renaissance. Classics such as Plato's Republic, Plutarch's Lives, Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, Dante's Divine Comedy may be read. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. (Cross-listed with PHIL 3341 and PSCI 3341)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3342 Great Books: Renaissance-Pres

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition since the Renaissance, from Cervantes to the present. Classics such as de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Wollstonecrafts' A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Nietzsche's The Uses and Abuses of History, Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" may be read.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor (Cross-listed with PHIL 3342, and PSCI 3342)

ENGL 3351 World Mythology

A study of the nature, cause, and use of myths through wide reading in various mythologies. Special emphasis upon the effects found in American life of the Classical, Norse, and Judeo-Christian traditions, and upon myth as a contemporary phenomenon.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3352 World Folklore

A study of folklore, the processes of folklore, and the usefulness of folklore in general culture and literature.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3361 Multicultural Children's Lit

Advanced study of the Multicultural Children's Literature genre. Special emphasis will be placed on Hispanic literature. Literature will be studied in translation and/or in the original language.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3362 Young Adult Literature

Covers the literature written for young adults (YAs) and analyzes how this literature meets the varying developmental stages of YAs. Students will conduct numerous individual and group assignments typically required of YAs providing future educators a first-hand opportunity to develop a teaching philosophy regarding the use of YA literature in the classroom.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3366 Twentieth Century Poetry

Reading of English and American poetry published since 1900 including the work of such writers as Yeats, De la Mare, Housman, Rich, Sexton, Frost, Eliot, and Plath.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3370 Survey of Film History

Historical and critical survey of American and/or international Cinema with an emphasis on its major developments both as art form and mass medium. Screenings required.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3371 Film Literature

A study of the literary and dramaturgical components of film production and interpretation. Subjects, genres, or themes may vary. Screening lab required.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3380 History of Literary Thought

A study of the major philosophers of literature, from the ancients to the moderns.

Prerequisites: Three hours sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 3390 History of the English Lang

The study of the English language from Anglo-Saxon times to present day.

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4198 Undergraduate Research

Advanced students will develop a project in the field of English in consultation with and approval from the instructor that, depending upon the scope of the project, will determine the credit hours, which must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 4298 Undergraduate Research

Advanced students will develop a project in the field of English in consultation with and approval from the instructor that, depending upon the scope of the project, will determine the credit hours, which must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 4301 The Teaching of Composition

Provides an overview of modern composition theory that informs the teaching of writing in secondary and post-secondary education, including state and national standards and trends. Required for 7-12 Certification.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4302 Iss in the Teach of English

Addresses current issues in the teaching of English, ranging from pedagogical approaches to the teaching of composition to the theoretical underpinnings of English literature, language, literacy, and rhetoric. Attention is paid to national trends and state standards for individuals planning to teach English Language Arts (ELA) in secondary schools.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4306 Studies Rhet: Edu,Dem,Citizen

This course will examine how identity of citizenship in America is developed within the public space of democracy. Specifically, the impact of education upon citizenship identity, and how that identity acts within the social space of democracy will be evaluated. Rhetorical manifestations of democracy in action will be accomplished by readings ranging from uses of rhetoric in community dialogue, as well as national dialogues, including an examination of presidential rhetoric. Course may be repeated for credit when topic varies.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a grade of “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4307 Creative Writing

An exploration of current theory and creative writing techniques through the study of required readings and the application of techniques in students' own work. Genres covered will regularly include poetry, fiction, non-fiction and other genres offered occasionally. May be repeated for credit up to four times but not more than twice in the same genre.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4311 Contrastive Linguistics

Designed to produce competencies in an understanding of the similarities and differences between English and Spanish and in teaching both languages to students who have one of them as a native tounge.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 300-level ENGL course with a "C" or better, or consent of the instructor.

ENGL 4312 American Dialects

Designed to help a student distinguish the differences between Standard American English and the various forms of English spoken and written in various geographic areas and social levels in the United States. Special emphasis on Texas English as it is used along the Rio Grande and in other areas of the state.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4313 Advanced English Grammar

Designed to produce competencies in understanding the English language in its theory, sound, words, grammar (both traditional and modern grammars), and its spelling.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4314 Studies in Language

A special topics seminar in some aspect of the study of language. The course may focus on a special problem in linguistics, heritage languages, second language acquisition, history of the language, literacy, the teaching of the language or language policy and implementation. Prerequiste: Six hours Sophomore literature or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

ENGL 4320 Studies in English Literature

Features readings in selected author, historical periods, literary movements, genres, themes, or cultural issues in English literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4321 Major British Authors

An intensive study of the works of one or two major British authors. May not duplicate existing major author courses. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4322 Shakespeare's Major Plays

Designed to produce competencies in the types of plays which Shakespeare wrote and techniques for understanding and critiquing them as well as exposure to the most well-known of his works.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4323 Shakespeare in Performance

An exploration of the ways Shakespeare’s plays have been interpreted and reinterpreted both on the stage and in film to reflect societal or cultural assumptions at the time of production. Students will study at least four plays in the context of either stage or film productions of a given play and then perform a scene in the context of current issues.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4324 Women in Shakespeare

An examination of Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic technique in the context of his focus on women’s issues and roles in society. Readings of selected plays and non-dramatic poems will relate Shakespeare’s interpretations of feminine power and potential in his own time to contemporary perspectives.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4325 Studies in Shakespeare

This course is designed to explore special topics. themes, or issues in Shakespearean studies. Students will practice interpreting Shakespeare's work in light of social and cultural contexts of Shakespeare's England and within current research in the field. May be repeated once the topic changes.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a "C" or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4328 Studies in Rest 18th Cent Lit

This course provides students with an in-depth examination of a topic, theme, motif, author, movement, or genre in Restoration and eighteenth-century literature. Possible topics include eighteenth-century theater traditions, female amatory fiction, poetry by women, print culture, and the domestic novel. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4330 Studies in American Lit

Features readings in selected authors, historical periods, literary movements, genres, themes, or cultural issues in American literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4331 Major American Authors

An intensive study of the works of one or two major American authors. May not duplicate existing major author courses. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4334 The American Lit Renaissance

A study of American literature between 1836 and 1860, featuring selections by such writers as Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau, Douglas, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Fern, and Whitman.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4335 Minority Voices

A study of United States culture as one of many peoples and ways of life and literature itself as a device for securing equality among them.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4336 Chicano/a Literature

A study of literature written by Mexican Americans from 1848 to the present. This course explores poetry, fiction and drama from a historical and thematic approach.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4339 Reading Nature in American Lit

An exploration of the changing perception of the American environment/s in literature and related arts, and the ideologies underlying such perception. Utilizing the theoretical tools of Ecocriticism, the course approaches the ways that humans have interacted with the environment in the United States and the cultural responses to such interactions. The course can be organized historically or thematically. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a "C" or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4340 Studies in World Literature

An intensive study of a particular period, movement, or major author of World Literature. Readings will be in English translation. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4341 Major World Authors

An intensive study of the works of one or two major non-British or non-American authors. May not duplicate existing major author courses. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4342 The Bible as Literature

An in-depth literary study of the Bible, with emphasis on the formal features of narrative, hymn, prophecy, apocalypse, gospel, and epistle. Historical, cultural, and archaeological considerations are included.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4347 Movement and Eras

A study of the recognized literature, authors, and philosophies of any culture or nationality that can best be understood in narrow time periods and/or movements; for instance, The European Enlightenment, the Harlem Renaissance, Modernism. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4380 Philosophy in Literature

Formulation and critical analysis of philosophical ideas in selected literary works. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: 3000-level English or 2000- or 3000-level Philosophy course with a grade of “C” or better (Cross-listed with PHIL 4380).

ENGL 4384 Current Trends in Rhet Theory

An examination of the leading trends in contemporary rhetorical theory and epistemology. Participants will study selected readings by major theorists on topics that include, but are not limited to, social epistemology, minority voices, mass media, and composition.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4385 Literature and Gender

An introduction to literature that explores issues of gender and sexuality. The course examines questions of canonicity, difference, equality, and sexuality, and how these issues are represented in literary and other cultural contexts. Special attention will be paid to the intersections of gender with sexuality, race, class, ability, and nationality. Sample topics include women’s literature, queer literature, literature and masculinity, or desire in literature. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4388 Existentialism

A study of the nature of human existence and experience in the philosophies of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Miguel de Unamuno, Kafka, Ortega y Gasset, Sartre, and Camus. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with PHIL 4388)

Prerequisites: 3000-level English or 2000- or 3000-level Philosophy course with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 4390 Studies in Language

A special topics seminar in some aspect of the study of language. The course may focus on a special problem in linguistics, heritage languages, second language acquisition, history of the language, literacy, the teaching of the language or language policy and implementation. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Prerequisites: Three hours of one 3000-level ENGL course with a “C” or better or consent of instructor.

ENGL 4397 International Service Learning

Engagement in activities that combine both academic learning and community service in a foreign country. Students participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community needs. Students are required to reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. Final service projects must be presented to a broad audience. May be combined with Study Abroad and may be conducted in English or in the language of the host country. Faculty supervisor required.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 4398 Undergraduate Research

Advanced students will develop a project in the field of English in consultation with and approval from the instructor that, depending upon the scope of the project, will determine the credit hours, which must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 4399 Senior Seminar - WIN

A special topics capstone course required of all English and English Language Arts majors. Course readings, class discussions, and writings will focus on a highly defined issue in the study of literature or language. All senior seminars will require that students develop and demonstrate command of the research process and superior writing skills as this is a WIN-designated course. To earn credit for this course, students must earn a grade of “C” or better. Prerequisite or

Corequisites: ENGL 3391; ENGL 4322, 4323, 4324, or 4325; and ENGL 3311 or 4313, and senior standing.

ENGL 4498 Undergraduate Research

Advanced students will develop a project in the field of English in consultation with and approval from the instructor that, depending upon the scope of the project, will determine the credit hours, which must be approved by the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

FREN 1311 Elementary French I

An oral and written introduction to French for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Through pattern drills, the course stresses acquisition of vocabulary, pronunciation, and the formation of sentences in everyday conversation. Three hours plus one hour lab.

TCCN: FREN 1411

FREN 1312 Elementary French II

A continuation of FREN 1311, with added stress on the written language. Three hours plus one hour lab.

Prerequisites: FREN 1311 or equivalent course.

TCCN: FREN 1412

FREN 1620 Elementary French I and II

An intensive oral and written introduction to French for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Through pattern drills, the course stresses acquisition of vocabulary, pronunciation, and the formation of sentences in everyday conversation. Six hours plus one hour lab. (Cross-listed with FREN 1311 and FREN 1312)

FREN 2311 Intermediate French I

Review of grammar introduced in FREN 1311 and 1312; readings of average difficulty in French; practice in conversation and composition.

Prerequisites: FREN 1312.

FREN 2312 Intermediate French II

Continuation of FREN 2311 with more advanced readings.

Prerequisites: FREN 2311.

FREN 2620 Intermediate French I and II

An intensive intermediate French course for students who have finished the beginning French course sequence (FREN 1311 & FREN 1312). Review of grammar introduced in FREN 1311 and 1312; readings of average difficulty in French; practice in conversation and composition. Six hours plus one hour lab. (Cross-listed with FREN 2311 and FREN 2312).

Prerequisites: FREN 1312.

FREN 3303 French Culture & Civilization

This is a survey course for students interested in understanding francophone culture from general concepts of culture to different art expressions. The course focuses on communication in contexts that develop and consolidate students’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. It utilizes films, cultural readings, and literary selections that expose students to poems, essays, and short stories by writers from diverse francophone countries.

Prerequisites: FREN 1311 and 1312, or FREN 1620, or FREN 1311 and permission of instructor.

FREN 3304 French & Francophone Cinema

This course is a survey pf French and Francophone cinema from the earliest productions to the contemporary period. It will analyze the social and historical conditions that gave rise to the landmark films. Topics for discussion include the impact of history, politics, literature, class, ethnicity, gender, colonialism, migration on selected films.

Prerequisites: FREN 2312 or equivalent.

FREN 3305 Intro to the French Literature

This course introduces students to the study of French literature by analyzing texts from classical and non-traditional Francophone sources. The content covers the basic premises of modern literary theory with the intent of bolstering the students’ essay-writing and commentary skills.

Prerequisites: FREN 2312 or equivalent.

FREN 3306 French Conversation

Application of French grammar and vocabulary with emphasis on idiomatic constructions and expressions. Intensive French conversation based on cultural topics and current events will lead to a natural and colloquial usage and fluency.

Prerequisites: FREN 2312 or equivalent.

FREN 3307 Trans FREN>ENGL, ENGL>FREN

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems of short text, while developing practical translation skills.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302, and FREN 2312 or equivalent.

GERM 1311 Beginning German I

An introduction to the German language and German-speaking cultures. The course focuses on the development of basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This is the first part of a two-part introduction to German.

TCCN: GERM 1411

GERM 1312 Beginning German II

A continuation of GERM 1311. The course focuses on the development of basic communication skills in German. It is designed to develop the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The language of instruction is German. This is the second part of a two-part introduction to German.

Prerequisites: GERM 1311.

TCCN: GERM 1412

GERM 1620 Beginning German I & II

German 1620 is an introduction to the German language and German-speaking cultures. The course focuses on the development of basic communication skills in German. It is designed to develop the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. This course offers students a one-semester course equivalent to GERM 1311 & 1312.

GERM 2311 Intermediate German

Designed to strengthen students' language skills and develop cultural competency. This course keeps intermediate-level students involved and focused on real communication in meaningful contexts. Students improve their language skills through practical grammar, vocabulary presentations, and television, short films, and cultural readings.

Prerequisites: GERM 1620 or GERM 1311 and GERM 1312.

GERM 2321 Intermediate German I

Designed to strengthen students’ language skills and develop cultural competency. This course keeps intermediate-level students involved and focused on real communication in meaningful contexts. Students improve their language skills through practical grammar, vocabulary presentations, and television, short films, and cultural readings.

Prerequisites: German 1620 or German 1311 & German 1312.

GERM 3303 German Culture & Civilization

This course emphasizes the broadening of reading and conversational skills. Students become familiar with many aspects of the culture and civilization of the German-speaking countries. The course will also explore aspects of the current political, economic, social and cultural situation of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Students have the opportunity to discuss issues, ideas and opinions in German on selected topics.

Prerequisites: GERM 2311.

GERM 3307 Trans GERM>ENGL, ENGL>GERM

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems of short text, while developing practical translation skills.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302, and GERM 2312 or equivalent.

HIST 1301 The US to 1877

This course covers discovery; European contributions and forces; Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the Americas; English, French, and Dutch in America. The English Colonies in America; accomplishments of nationalistic groups; War of Independence; establishment of the new nation, problems of the formative period, western development, and frontier influence; cultural and constitutional growth; internal dissension and international problems; and Reconstruction. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

TCCN: HIST 1301

HIST 1302 The US Since 1877

Covers the growth of national ideas; movement for individual freedom; party government and public interests; industrial development; labor problems and agrarian unrest; changing international policies; war and peace; problems of agriculture, business, and government; cultural progress and attempts at social cooperation; and current world problems and trends. It is recommended that HIST 1301 be taken before 1302. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

TCCN: HIST 1302

HIST 2150 Historical Biography

This course provides an account of a prominent figure's life with the intent of examining the person's historical significance.

HIST 2151 History and Film

This course provides an examination of the interaction between historical research and various forms of film media including feature films abd documentaries.

HIST 2250 Historical Biography

This course provides an account of a prominent figure's life with the intent of examining the person's historical significance.

HIST 2251 History and Film

This course provides an examination of the interaction between historical research and various forms of film media including feature films abd documentaries.

HIST 2321 Eastern Civilization

This course provides a study a study of eastern civilizations, including those of Africa, Asia and regions of the Middle East.

TCCN: HIST 2321

HIST 2322 Western Civilization

This course provides a study of western civilization including the ancient societies of Greece and Rome, feudal Europe and the modern European nation states.

TCCN: HIST 2322

HIST 2350 Historical Biography

This course provides an account of a prominent figure's life with the intent of examining the person's historical significance.

HIST 2351 History and Film

This course provides an examination of the interaction between historical research and various forms of film media including feature films abd documentaries.

HIST 2420 The American Way

This course will focus on the major events that helped to make the United States what it is today, including the Colonial Era and Independence, specifically the writing of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, as well as the majors events of the 19th and 20th centuries. The branches of government, including the checks and balances and separation of powers, will be emphasized as well as the civil rights and liberties of all citizens. An element of the course is faculty-led travel to important historical and governmental sites in Texas. Fulfills the Texas State requirement in history and U.S. government. Enrollment restricted to qualified international students enrolled in joint degree programs.

HIST 3302 History of Texas

Covers the history of Texas from the early explorations to modern times. Course stresses the development of comprehension, analytic, and evaluative skills with regard to important issues, including Spanish colonial influences on Texas, the Texas Revolutionary period, the rise of the cattle kingdom, and recent social, economic and political developments. This course may not be substituted for any course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or permission of instructor.

HIST 3303 Historical Methods-WIN

This required course is designed to give history majors and minors a grounding in the methodologies that professional historians utilize in their scholarship. Designed to be taken at the beginning of work on the major, the class will consider a number of important topics in the research and writing of history. Emphasis will be given to issues such as how historians find and examine evidence, how they pose questions, and how they reach answers to those questions. This course may not be substituted for any other course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301/1302.

HIST 3310 Military History of the US

This course covers US military history from early colonial warfare in the eighteenth century to the global war on terrorism in the twenty-first century. It includes the role military officers have played in the development ofthe United States.

Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

HIST 3320 The World Since 1914

Forces, movements and events which have produced present world conditions.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or permission of instructor.

HIST 3330 Colonial Latin America

Transformation of Latin America under Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule (1492-1826). Course emphasizes the convergence of indigenous, European, and African peoples that laid the foundations for modern Latin American society. Topics include conquest and settlement, the impact of slavery, and cultural-intellectual changes that led to independence.

HIST 3331 Modern Latin America

Social and political challenges faced by Latin American nations from independence to present. Emphasis on foreign relations, revolutionary insurgency, and Latin America’s role in the modern world economy.

HIST 3332 Mexico

Political, economic, and cultural evolution of Mexican society from pre-conquest to present. Emphasis on Mexico’s connections to the wider world through topics such as global trade, nationalism, neocolonialism, and liberalism.

HIST 3333 Central America & Caribbean

The Caribbean Basin’s impact on early modern and modern globalization. Course takes a cultural as well as economic approach to topics such as slavery, European imperial rivalries, plantation economies, piracy, monoculture, and U.S. interventionism. Includes comparative perspective of the Hispanic, English, and French Atlantic Worlds.

HIST 3340 World Cultural History

This course examines the historical development, purpose, and influence of cultural activities, beliefs, and expressions found in a specific region or society of the world.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3341 U.S. Cultural History

This course examines the historical development, purpose, and influence of cultural activities, beliefs, and expressions found in the US society and its Religions.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302

HIST 3370 U.S. Women's History

This course focuses on the diversity of women's experiences in North America from colonial to modern times. The social, economic, political, and intellectual realms of women's worlds, public and private, will be studied.

HIST 3371 History of US Workers

This course describes and analyzes the history of US workers from the colonial period to the present. Topics include economic development, migration and immigration, race and ethnicity, slave and free labor, and the activities and fortunes of the American labor union movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3375 U.S. Southern History

This course focuses on the diversity of women's experiences in North America from colonial to modern times. The social, economic, political, and intellectual realms of women's worlds, public and private, will be studied.

HIST 3379 World Intellectual History

The impact of major ideas on the development of nations and movements throughout history.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302.

HIST 3380 Intellectual History of the US

The impact of major ideas on the development of the nation. Topics may include Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, rise of democracy, the Women's Rights Movement, Social Darwinism, industrialism, populism, progressivism, pragmatism, socialism, the Civil Rights Movement, American art and thought, and those aspects of American thought that continue to agitate contemporary society.

HIST 3381 Sport and US History

This course frames the development of nineteenth and twentieth century American society and culture in the context of sport. Topics include the socio-economic origins of such sports as baseball, boxing, and football, labor demands and the influence of money in US Sport, the conflicts over racial prejudice, exclusion, and integration, and he issues of gender roles and athletics.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3385 Mexican American History

This course is an examination of Mexican American history from the Spanish colonial period to the present. Topics include, the history of the Spanish borderlands, US annexation of the borderlands, nineteenth century labor and political systems, migration and immigration, and twentieth century Mexican American political activism. Prerequisite HIST 1301 and 1302.

HIST 3386 World Immigration History

This course investigates the reasons why people from specific reasons or societies around the world migrate and the motivations and experiences of specific groups of immigrants. Topics include trade, colonialism, economic and religious factors, and issues of gender, race, and legal statuses.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3387 U.S. Immigration History

This course investigates the reason why people migrate to and within the US and the motivations and experiences of these immigrants. Topics include economic, social, and cultural factors, and issues of gender, race, and legal status.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302.

HIST 3391 Islamic Civil 600-1400 CE

This course will survey the diverse history of Islamic societies from the 7th to the 16th century. Topics include: the pre-Islamic Middle East; Arabian society; Muhammad and the rise of the new religion; the expansion of Islam in Asia, Africa and Europe; the fundamental belief system of Islam; the Caliphate of Baghdad; the development of various schools of Islamic theology; the coming of the Turks; revolutionary Shi’ism; the Muslim experience in India, Africa and Central Asia; decline of Islamic power; and the crusades. While much of the focus will be on trends affecting the Islamic World as a whole, attention will also be given to selected regional issues. Students will be introduced to several primary source materials in translation such as selections from the Qur’an, philosophical works and travelers’ accounts.

HIST 3392 Contemporary Islamic World

This course explores some of the major themes that have led to the rise of the contemporary Islamic world. Themes that will be discussed include the diversity of interpretations within Islam such as Wahabism and mysticism, the legacy of the Ottoman Empire, gender relations in Islam, Islamic art and architecture, as well as the construction of nation states throughout the Islamic world. There will be a heavy emphasis on primary sources.

HIST 3393 History of Africa to 1880

This course is a survey of the continent’s history from earliest pre-colonial times to the eve of European colonial conquest, focusing on diversity and change in African societies. Themes include the development of pre-colonial technology and trade, state formation and Africa’s incorporation in the growing world economy.

HIST 3394 History of Africa Since 1880

This course is a survey course of major events and processed that occurred on the continent of Africa after 1800. Focusing on select cases and examples that illustrate larger trends and issues, this course concentrates on the expansion of African trade and states, European colonization, African response to colonial rule, African independence movements, and recent challenges and events in African nations (including underdevelopment, poverty and genocide).

HIST 3395 Contemporary South Asia

Contemporary South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Nepal, and the Maldive Islands) contains a diversity of languages, cultures, religions and histories. It is also one of the most densely populated regions of the world. Using a thematic approach to study modern South Asia, this course places this region into historical, political, and socio-economic contexts across the dividing line of empires and nation-states.

HIST 3396 Borders & Identities in India

This course explores the shaping of nationalist movements and ideologies throughout the Indian subcontinent. It describes how both the colonial past and anti-colonial struggles impacted the processes of nation-building and identity formation, as well as present-day social and economic structures Themes that will be explored include education, gender, religion, culture, identity, nationalism, immigration, and popular culture.

HIST 4310 Historical Perspectives

This is the required capstone course for graduating history majors and minors to bring together many of the ideas and skills which they have learned during their coursework in history. The class will focus on an overview of historiography, the scholarship of historical writing. The course will emphasize the broader themes of world history and their impact on different eras and groups of people. Professional applied skills of historians such as research, presentation, and writing in multiple formats will be part of the course. May not be substituted for any other course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: HIST 3303 and Senior standing.

HIST 4316 Colonial America: Dis-1763

An examination of the political, social, economic, ideological, religious, and institutional development of America from the age of discovery and early settlements to the end of the French and Indian War. The course will emphasize the regional geography, folkways, and culture of the Chesapeake colonies, Puritan New England, the Lower South, and the Mid-Atlantic societies.

HIST 4317 Am Rev/Early Nat Era 1763-1815

A study of the international and colonial developments leading to the American Revolution and the winning of independence from Great Britain. Also includes: U. S. society's beginnings under the Articles of Confederation; the making of the Constitution of 1787, the forging of American institutions and culture under the first presidents, forces leading up to American involvement in the War of 1812, and the impact of the War on American civilization.

HIST 4318 Age of Jackson to Civil War

An examination of the major themes in U. S. history from 1815-1865, including the Market Revolution, the expansion of Jacksonian Democracy, the rise of the Old South, antebellum reform movements, westward expansion, and the rising tensions leading to the Civil War. This course will also include a detailed study of the Civil War itself, with consideration for its military, political, social, economic, and cultural impact of the United States.

HIST 4320 The Middle Ages

Europe from the downfall of Rome to the 14th century. The study of development of feudal society; impact of Islamic and Byzantine worlds; rise of the Papacy and the Crusades; economic life, technology, and invention; intellectual revival of the 12th century; crises of the 13th century; and developments of the later Middle Ages. May be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or permission of instructor.

HIST 4338 Pre-Modern Europe

Europe’s transition from Greco-Roman Antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Emphasis on the development of pre-modern social and political order, including Athenian democracy, Romanization, feudalism, and manorialism. Special topics include the rise of Christian orthodoxy, Islamic expansion in Southern Europe (especially Iberia), and medieval chivalry.

HIST 4339 Renaissance & Reform Europe

The history of two important cultural movements that marked the beginning of Europe’s transition into the modern era. Course places special emphasis on the interplay between religion, politics, economics, and artistic production.

HIST 4340 Early Modern Europe: 1600-1789

A history of the political, social, economic and intellectual character of 17th and 18th century Europe. May be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science.

HIST 4341 19th Century Europe

An examination of the political, social and cultural development of Europe from 1814 to 1914. May be taken for graduate credit. (Formerly HIST 3342)

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or political science.

HIST 4342 Modern Europe: 1914-1990

An examination of the political, social and cultural development of Europe in the 20th Century.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4350 North American Borderlands

This course examines and compares the US-Spanish/Mexican, US-Canadians, US-Native American borderlands from the colonial period to the present. The course focuses on border regions and frontiers as centers of society, politics, and culture.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 4364 US Southern History

Study of the major themes in the history of the southern U.S., including slavery, the rise of sectionalism, secession and Civil War, the development of Jim Crow laws and customs, the Lost Cause, and the Civil Rights Movement. This course will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the South and its impact on the nation as a whole. May be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Six semester credit hours of history.

HIST 4366 Building Modern Am, 1865-1914

The United States from Reconstruction to the Progressive Era, including industrialization, immigration, urbanization, the rise of Jim Crow, Populism, labor, and social and political reform. Themes include the dramatic changes in U. S. political, racial, gender, economic, and cultural spheres and their impact on the beginnings of "the American century".

Prerequisites: Six semester credit hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4367 U.S. Rise to Wrld Pwr:1914-45

The United States during World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression, and World War II.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4368 United States Since 1945

The Cold War; social and cultural changes; the Vietnam era; and the Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and /or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4380 Women in the Developing World

This course examines women in the developing world during the pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial periods. More specifically, it explores the social changes that have taken place in Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. Among the topics addressed will be changing gender norms, ethnicity and identity, religion, polygyny, sati, motherhood, education, nationalism, political activism, and the current AIDS epidemic. In each case, the emphasis will not be on victimization or cultural decline but rather, the resilience and adaptability of women as “historical actors” in the developing world.

HIST 4390 Seminar in US History

Lectures, directed readings, seminar reports, and supervised research in a specified field of history. May be repeated once when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4391 Seminar in World History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of specific nations or regions of the world from an historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4392 Seminar in European History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of specific nations or regions of Europe from a historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

HIST 4393 Sem. in Latin American History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of specific nations or regions of Latin America from a historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

HIST 4394 Seminar in Eastern History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of Eastern civilizations from a historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

HIST 4395 Urban Historical Geography

The study of the continuing evolution of urban landscapes in Western civilization. An examination of urban form and function through time from Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman cities to industrial and post-industrial cities and suburbs. May be taken for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with GEOG 4395 and URBS 4395).

HUM 2301 The Western Cultural Tradition

This writing intensive course introduces students, through selective readings, to the Western intellectual tradition, starting from the Greco-Roman epoch and extending through the Middle Ages to the present. This course fulfills a core curriculum requirement for some majors.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 or equivalent.

HUM 3301 Studies in World Hist & Cult

An advanced special topics course offered for both WIN and Honors credit, this course will feature an depth cross-disciplinary study of a topic or a defined historical period in world history. Readings will typically be drawn from more than one area of human knowledge, areas as diverse as art, anthropology, religion, science, philosophy, history, music, literature, psychology, and political and social theory. Depending on the topic, the course may be cross-indexed with an appropriate discipline and count for credit in the major. May be repeated once for credit when the topic changes.

Prerequisites: “B” or higher in ENGL 2322, 2323, 2327, 2328, 2332, or 2333.

HUM 4173 Undergraduate Research

A course adapted to the directed, interdisciplinary study of topics in the liberal arts. Advanced students will develop a project in cooperation with a designated instructor chosen by the student. The nature of the material may allow for the involvement of multiple instructors. The project will be established by the student with the approval of the designated instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the designated instructor.

HUM 4273 Undergraduate Research

A course adapted to the directed, interdisciplinary study of topics in the liberal arts. Advanced students will develop a project in cooperation with a designated instructor chosen by the student. The nature of the material may allow for the involvement of multiple instructors. The project will be established by the student with the approval of the designated instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the designated instructor.

HUM 4373 Undergraduate Research

A course adapted to the directed, interdisciplinary study of topics in the liberal arts. Advanced students will develop a project in cooperation with a designated instructor chosen by the student. The nature of the material may allow for the involvement of multiple instructors. The project will be established by the student with the approval of the designated instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the designated instructor.

HUM 4473 Undergraduate Research

A course adapted to the directed, interdisciplinary study of topics in the liberal arts. Advanced students will develop a project in cooperation with a designated instructor chosen by the student. The nature of the material may allow for the involvement of multiple instructors. The project will be established by the student with the approval of the designated instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the designated instructor.

INTL 1101 Global Issues Seminar I

Students in this course will gain a broad overview of the geography, language, history, religions, political and social institutions, and cultural practices of a variety of countries. Students will complete an independent study of one aspect of one country or global issue of contemporary concern. In addition to foreign national faculty delivering presentations on their native countries, faculty whose research focuses on issues with a global aspect will provide students with an overview of an international problem and the challenges facing world leadership in addressing the problem. Topics change each semester.

INTL 1102 Global Issues Seminar II

This course is a continuation of INTL 1101. Topics change with each semester.

INTL 2101 Global Issues Seminar III

This course is a continuation of INTL 1101 and INTL 1102. Topics change with each semester.

INTL 2102 Global Issues Seminar IV

This course is a continuation of INTL 1101, INTL 1102, and INTL 2101. Topics change with each semester.

ITAL 1311 Elementary Italian I

An oral and written introduction to Italian for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Through pattern drills, the course stresses acquisition of vocabulary, pronunciation, and the formation of sentences in everyday conversation.

TCCN: ITAL 1411

ITAL 1312 Elementary Italian II

This course is a continuation of ITAL 1311, with added stress on the written language.

TCCN: ITAL 1412

ITAL 1620 Elementary Italian I & II

This course provides an oral and written introduction to the Italian language for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The course emphasizes the need to acquire an ear for the sound of Italian and an introduction to the language’s grammatical structures.

ITAL 2311 Intermediate Italian I

Review of grammar introduced in ITAL 1311 and 1312; readings of average difficulty in Italian; practice in conversation and composition. Prerequisites ITAL 1312 or ITAL 1620.

ITAL 2312 Intermediate Italian II

This class is a continuation of ITAL 2311 using more advanced readings.

Prerequisites: ITAL 2311.

ITAL 2620 Intermediate Italian I & II

An intensive intermediate Italian course for students who have completed the beginning Italian course sequence (ITAL 1311 and 1312). Review of grammar introduced in ITAL 1311 and 1312; reading of average difficulty in Italian; practice in conversation and composition. Equivalent to both ITAL 2311 and ITAL 2312.

Prerequisites: ITAL 1312 or equivalent course.

ITAL 3307 Trans ITAL>ENGL, ENGL>ITAL

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze, and resolve translation problems of short text, while developing practical translation skills.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302, and ITAL 2312 or equivalent.

LAS 4302 Senior Sem In Latin Am Studies

A multidisciplinary analysis of issues relating to Latin America. Students will develop interdisciplinary, independent projects.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and Latin American Studies major.

LAS 4310 Latin American Info Resources

This course will focus on analyzing the Latin American information infrastructure. Both public and private information resources and networks will be surveyed with emphasis in the social sciences. Students will be exposed to the state of Latin American information services as a mechanism for understanding the position of the region in the information age.

LAS 4397 International Service Learning

This course seeks to engage students in activities that combine both academic learning and community service in a foreign country. Students participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community needs. Students are required to reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. Final service projects must be presented to a broad audience. May be combined with Study Abroad and may be conducted in English, Spanish or Protuguese. Faculty supervisor required.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MAND 1311 Intro Mand Chinese Non-Nat I

A course designed for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Students will acquire basic oral communication skills, develop general knowledge of Chinese syntax, and gain knowledge of Hanzi (characters) in reading and writing. Chinese history and society are an integral component of this course.

TCCN: CHIN 1411

MAND 1312 Intro Mand Chinese Non-Nat II

This second level course is designed for students with an introductory knowledge of the lanugage. The course emphasizes oral language skills in real-life contexts and reading and writing skills with Hanzi characters. Chinese history and culture are an integral part of the course.

Prerequisites: MAND 1311 or equivalent course, or departmental placement exam.

TCCN: CHIN 1412

MAND 2311 Intermediate Mandarin I

Review and application of skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasizes conversation, vocabulary acquisition, reading, composition, and culture.

Prerequisites: MAND 1312 or equivalent course.

PHIL 1301 Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to philosophy as the speculative attempt to present a systematic and complete view of all reality. Students will be introduced to the writings of seminal philosophers as well as to the role of logic and forms of argumentation.

TCCN: PHIL 1301

PHIL 2301 Introduction to Logic

A study of the methods and principles of correct reasoning, both deductive and inductive; fallacies, and arguments together with analysis of the proposition.

PHIL 2306 Introduction to Ethics

An introduction to the elements of moral philosophy including, but not limited to, the following issues: What is morality?; Cultural and Moral Relativism; Does Morality depend on Religion?; Ethical Egoism; Deontology, including Kant's Categorical Imperative and Respect for Reasons; The Idea of a Social Contract; and The Ethics of Virtue.

TCCN: PHIL 2306

PHIL 3302 Philosophy of Law

An examination and evaluation of some basic practices and principles of Anglo-American law. The course will focus on such problems as: the nature and extent of legal liability, strict liability statutes, "Good Samaritan" laws, the law of criminal attempts, the enforcement of community moral standards, the obligation to obey the law, the justification of punishment and capital punishment, civil obedience, and affirmative action and reverse discrimination. We will examine prominent legal cases and their underlying principles, but the emphasis will be on the philosophical analysis and evaluation of the law in these areas. Readings will be drawn from both classical and contemporary sources. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary

PHIL 3304 Contemporary Moral Issues

Philosophical examination of selected moral problems arising out of contemporary society. Some of the moral problems we will explore are: abortion, euthanasia, poverty and hunger, war, animal rights, human cloning, and other biomedical issues.

PHIL 3316 Classical Renaisn. Philosophy

This course will cover the major philosophers from the Hellenistic and Roman philosophy of antiquity beginning circa 600 B.C.E. to the significant texts of the seventeenth-century in courses of study like theology, metaphysics, epistemology, moral psychology, aesthetics, and the utopian project of the West. Possible philosophers include such thinkers as the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Berkeley, Hobbes, Machiavelli, Leibniz, Bacon, and Locke. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

PHIL 3317 The Age of Reason

This course covers the major developments in philosophical thought from the 18th century through to the major thinkers of today. It deals with “modern” and “postmodern” topics such as the limits of science, political epistemology, aesthetics, hermeneutics, post-structuralism, critical theory, deconstruction, contemporary Marxist strategies, semiotics, cultural studies, gender studies, race theory, humantechnological interplay, and other issues. The course can include the works of such thinkers as Hume, Rousseau, Voltaire, Emerson, Marx, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Freud, Lacan, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Wittgenstein, Lyotard, Derrida, Foucault, Spivak, Barthes, and many others. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

PHIL 3321 Philosophy of Religion

This course is an introduction to the academic study of religion. The study of religion may include theological examinations of the questions about god (its existence, nature, our ability to know it, etc.) or surveys of diverse religions from around the world such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and many others. These studies may also include the sub-groups or sects found within each of these religions. In addition, the course can include studies of indigenous or oral religious traditions as well. While the course can cover some of the history, biographies, and customs within these religions, its true focus will be the philosophical theories and arguments behind these worldviews and/or the questions pertaining to the existence and nature of a spiritual life. While there may be comparison between these religions, an appreciation for the unique cultural identity of each will be emphasized. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary.

PHIL 3341 Great Books: Classical to Ren

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition before the Renaissance, from Greco-Roman period to Renaissance. Classics such as Plato's Republic, Plutarch's Lives, Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, Dante's Divine Comedy may be read. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3341, and PSCI 3341)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

PHIL 3342 Great Books: Renaissance-Pres

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition since the Renaissance, from Cervantes to the present. Classics such as de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Wollstonecrafts' A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Nietzsche's The Uses and Abuses of History, Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" may be read. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3342, and PSCI 3342)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

PHIL 4302 Philosophy in Literature

Formulation and critical analysis of philosophical ideas in selected literary works. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4302)

PHIL 4310 Great Thinkers

This course involves the critical analysis of a specified philosopher’s ideas over the course of his or her career through the examination of selected works. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite ENGL 1302.

PHIL 4380 Philosophy in Literature

Formulation and critical analysis of philosophical ideas in selected literary works. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4380)

Prerequisites: 2000 or 3000 level English or Philosophy course with a grade of C or better.

PHIL 4388 Existentialism

A study of the nature of human existence and experience in the philosophies of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Miguel de Unamuno, Kafka, Ortega y Gasset, Sartre, and Camus. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Cross-listed with ENGL 4388)

Prerequisites: 3000-level English or 2000- or 3000-level Philosophy course with a grade of “C” or better.

PORT 1311 Beginning Portuguese I

In this course, students will acquire fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures and culture.

TCCN: PORT 1411

PORT 1312 Beginning Portuguese II

A continuation of PORT 1311, students will acquire additional skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture.

Prerequisites: PORT 1311 or consent of instructor.

TCCN: PORT 1412

PORT 1620 Beginning Portuguese I and II

An intensive oral and written introduction to Portuguese; student will acquire fundamental skills in listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Includes basic vocabulary, grammatical structures, and culture. This course offers the student a one-semester course equivalent to PORT 1311 and PORT 1312.

PORT 3301 Intensive Portuguese

Conducted in Portuguese. This course is designed for Spanish speakers or for highly-motivated students with experience in another Romance language. Special emphasis on making the transition from Spanish to Portuguese using a communicative approach with emphasis on all language skills. This course may be used to meet the University foreign language Core Curriculum requirements or the second Romance language degree requirement in Spanish.

Prerequisites: Twelve hours of Spanish or another Romance Language or consent of the instructor.

PORT 3324 Luso-Brazilian Lit&Culture

Conducted in Portuguese. Thematic examination of some of the major cultural developments, overview of literary periods, and introduction to the major literary figures of Portugal, Brazil, and the Luso-African countries.

Prerequisites: PORT 3301.

SPAN 1311 Intro Spanish for Non-Native I

An oral and written introduction to Spanish for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The course emphasizes the need to acquire an ear for the sound of Spanish and an introduction to the language's grammatical structures. This is the first part of a two part introduction to Spanish. SPAN 1311 will not fulfill the COAS Foreign Language/Study Abroad requirements if a student has already received 6 SCH of introductory Spanish by having taken either the CLEP exam or AP high school courses.

Prerequisites: Departmental placement exam.

TCCN: SPAN 1411

SPAN 1312 Intro Span for Non-Native II

An oral and written introduction to Spanish for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The course emphasizes the need to acquire an ear for the sound of Spanish and an introduction to the language's grammatical structures. SPAN 1312 will not fulfill the COAS Foreign Language/Study Abroad requirements if a student has already received 6 SCH of introductory Spanish by having taken either the CLEP exam or AP high school courses.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1311 or equivalent course, or departmental placement exam.

TCCN: SPAN 1412

SPAN 1620 Intro Span Non-Ntve Spkrs I&II

An intensive beginning Spanish course for non-native speakers. An oral and written introduction to Spanish for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The course emphasizes the need to acquire an ear for the sound of Spanish and an introduction to the language's grammatical structures. This course offers students a one-semester course equivalent to SPAN 1311 and SPAN 1312. SPAN 1620 will not fulfill the COAS Foreign Language/Study Abroad requirements if a student has already received 6 SCH of introductory Spanish by having taken either the CLEP exam or AP high school courses.

SPAN 2307 Intro to Creative Writing

Conducted in Spanish. This introductory course is designed to give students the opportunity to explore their abilities and interests in a variety of genres. The course will emphasize the aesthetic demands of different genres through formal study of required readings and especially through first-hand experience of writing exercises. Students will write in at least two of the following genres: poetry, fiction, drama, screenwriting, and non-fiction.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2320.

SPAN 2311 Inter Span for Non-Native I

Conducted in Spanish. For students who have finished the beginning sequence of SPAN 1311/1312, or who, as a result of testing, demonstrate their readiness for this course. Emphasis includes both the oral and written language. Local Spanish language resources and media are used to help students exploit the linguistic resources of this Hispanic community and develop proficiency in their total use of Spanish. SPAN 2311 will not fulfill the COAS Foreign Language/Study Abroad requirements if a student has already received Spanish credit by having taken the AP exam.

Prerequisites: SPAN 1312, or SPAN 1620, or equivalent course, or departmental placement exam.

TCCN: SPAN 2311

SPAN 2312 Inter Span for Non-Native II

Conducted in Spanish. This course is the last course in a four-course sequence for non-native speakers of Spanish. As students complete their study of the oral and written conventions of Spanish, they are encouraged and prepared to make extensive use of the Hispanic environment which surrounds our University. SPAN 2312 will not fulfill the COAS Foreign Language/Study Abroad requirements if a student has already received Spanish credit by having taken the AP exam.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2311 or equivalent course, or departmental placement exam.

TCCN: SPAN 2312

SPAN 2313 Span Heritage Lang Speak I

Conducted in Spanish. A course for students from an English-Spanish dual language environment who have been exposed to spoken Spanish, but have little or no formal study of the language. A systematic presentation of oral and written conventions in Spanish will be presented along with identification of regional varieties of usage. This is the first part of a two-part introduction to Spanish for Spanish speakers.

Prerequisites: Departmental Placement exam.

TCCN: SPAN 2313

SPAN 2315 Span Heritage Lang Speak II

Conducted in Spanish. This is the second half of a course designed for students from a Hispanic environment who have been exposed to spoken Spanish, but have little or no formal study of the language. A systematic presentation of oral and written conventions in Spanish will be presented along with identification of regional varieties of usage, providing opportunities for expanding proficiency in Spanish for personal and professional use.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2313 or departmental placement exam.

TCCN: SPAN 2315

SPAN 2350 Intro to the Hispanic World

This is an introductory course for students interested in understanding Hispanic culture from general concepts of culture to different art expressions. How does a major geographical area come to be defined as Hispanic? What diverse elements merge together to form an identity? The course will focus on four fundamental elements: FAMILY (organization of the household, gender roles and personal interrelations); ETHNIC DIVERSITY (contributions to culture according to ethnicity); BELIEF SYSTEMS (religions, supernatural and superstitions –including holidays and practices); and ENTERTAINTMENT (sports, telenovelas, secular celebrations). Literature, radio, film, music, painting and other art expressions will be used during classes.

SPAN 2351 Intro to Iberian Culture&Civ

This is an introductory course for students interested in understanding Spanish culture from pre-Roman times onwards. It promotes awareness of the cultural, linguistic, and geographic diversity of the Iberian Peninsula with an emphasis on Spain. It analyzes the main periods in Spanish cultural history, with attention to Spain’s multicultural origins. Topics may include literature as a reflection of social reality nationalism and identity, contemporary artistic and cinematographic expressions, entertainment, sports, and gastronomy.

SPAN 2620 Inter Span Non-Ntve Spkrs I&II

An intensive intermediate Spanish course for students who have completed the beginning Spanish sequence (SPAN 1311 and SPAN 1312) or who, as a result of testing, demonstrate their readiness for this course. Emphasis includes both the oral and written language. As students complete their study of the oral and written conventions in Spanish, they are encouraged and prepared to make extensive use of the Hispanic environment that surrounds our university. This course offers students a one-semester course equivalent to SPAN 2311 and SPAN 2312. SPAN 2620 will not fulfill the COAS Foreign Language/Study Abroad requirements if a student has already received Spanish credit by having taken the AP exam.

SPAN 2630 Span for Heritage Lang I & II

Conducted in Spanish. A course for students from an English-Spanish dual language environment who have been exposed to spoken Spanish, but have little or no formal study of the language. A systematic presentation of oral and written conventions in Spanish will be presented along with identification of regional varieties of usage. This course offers the student a one-semester course equivalent to SPAN 2313 and 2315, Spanish for Spanish speakers.

Prerequisites: Departmental Placement exam.

SPAN 3305 Spanish Academic Writing

Conducted in Spanish. Required of all Spanish majors, minors, and students of bilingual education or dual language programs. This course will pay special attention to the various uses of writing to communicate effectively in specific rhetorical situations. Grammatical and mechanical correctness and vocabulary development will be studied within the context of producing clear and effective writing. May be taken concurrently with SPAN 3310.

Prerequisites: SPAN 2311 & 2312 or SPAN 2313 & 2315 or SPAN 2620 or 2630 or by placement test or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 3310 Intro to Literature in Spanish

Conducted in Spanish. Required of all Spanish majors and minors, and students of bilingual education or dual language programs. This course will provide students with a general knowledge of the literature of the Spanish-speaking world, while assisting the development of critical and analytical skills. The genres of poetry, prose and drama will be represented. May be taken concurrently with SPAN 3300. Prerequisite SPAN 2312 or SPAN 2315 or equivalent course or sufficient score on the placement exam.

SPAN 3317 Spanish Linguistics

Conducted in Spanish. This course is designed to give students insight into how the Spanish language functions as a system and why it works that way. The focus of the course will be on practical application of linguistic principles to improve the student's ability to use and perceive Spanish as an integrated linguistic system. It will present an overall view of Spanish phonology, morphology, and syntax as organized systems, pointing out to students relative correspondences and differences.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310.

SPAN 3321 Stud in Span Lit Before 1700

Conducted in Spanish. A chronological survey from the Jarchas and Poema de Mio Cid to the works of Calderon de la Barca.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310.

SPAN 3322 Stud in Span Lit After 1700

Conducted in Spanish. A chronological survey beginning with Columbus's letters, chronicles of the Spanish conquistadors, Cortes' letters, poetry and prose through Modernism.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310.

SPAN 3323 Stud in Span Am Lit: Conq-Mod

Conducted in Spanish. A chronological survey beginning with Columbus's letters, chronicles of the Spanish conquistadors, Cortes' letters, poetry and prose through Modernism.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310.

SPAN 3326 Stud Span Am Lit: 19th&20th

Conducted in Spanish. A chronological survey including Modernism and poetry, fiction and prose writings of the twentieth century, with emphasis in the development of the modern prose in Spanish America.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310.

SPAN 3350 Intro to Span>Engl Translation

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze and resolve translation problems of short texts, while developing practical translation skills. (Cross listed with TRAN 3350)

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and SPAN 3300.

SPAN 3351 Intro to English>Spanish Trans

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze and resolve basic translation problems of short texts, while developing practical translation skills. (Cross listed with TRAN 3351)

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and SPAN 3300.

SPAN 3390 Spanish Culture for the Prof

Designed for students who are interested in studying Spanish in the context of activities related to the professional world. This course will focus on domestic and international issues related to business and commerce, education, law enforcement, medicine, and social services and includes topics related to cultural considerations, generalized and specific professional concerns, correspondence, and translation. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310.

SPAN 4300 Contemp Span Am Soc in Lit

This course examines the relationship between art and the political, historical, and social realities of the Spanish American society through fiction written by some of its most distinguished writers such as Garcia Marquez, Allende, Vargas Llosa, Borges, Castellanos, Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes, etc.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4301 18th&19th Cent Span Lit

Conducted in Spanish. Studies literary production from 1700-1898 covering poetry, drama, and prose. This course may focus on genre, literary movement, specific authors or literary generations. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4302 20th Century Spanish Prose

Conducted in Spanish. Studies prose production from 1898 to the present covering essay, novel, and short story. This course may focus on specific literary movements, authors, or literary generations. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 or SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4303 The Spanish American Novel

Conducted in Spanish. A study of Spanish America's most widely acclaimed genre. Students will examine representative works of the older generation of novelists, including Sarmiento and Gairaldes, Gallegos and Rivera, as well as more modern writers such as Carpentier, Cortzar, Asturias, Vargas Llosa, Fuentes, Rulfo, and Garcia Marquez. The novels' historical, social, cultural and intellectual ambience will form an integral part of the course.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4304 The Generation of 1898

Conducted in Spanish. The Generation and its influence upon the growth and development of Spanish thought.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4305 Mod Span Lit: Drama&Poetry

Conducted in Spanish. The study of two major genres of modern Spanish literature, works of interest to a student planning graduate work in literature and to one interested in the intellectual and artistic life of modern Spain. The topic will be determined each time the course offered, mindful of the needs of both students and faculty. Topics include: Drama: Benavente, García Lorca, Calvo Sotelo, Buero Vallejo, Sastre, Valle-Inclán. Poetry: Machado, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and García Lorca and his generation. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4306 Colonial Spanish American Lit

Conducted in Spanish. Study of the Spanish American literature written from the colonial period to the years of the independence declared by the colonies. The course considers literature as well as the social and historical contexts.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4307 Span Am Lit: Poetry&ShortStory

Conducted in Spanish. The study of two major genres of Spanish American literature, works of interest both to students of modern Spanish American culture and to those planning graduate work in Spanish. The topic will be determined each time the course is offered, mindful of needs of both students and faculty. Works studied will include: Poetry: Darío, Neruda, Vallejo, Borges Short story: Cortázar, Rulfo, García Márquez, Borges. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4308 Cervantes & Don Quijote

Conducted in Spanish. An introduction to and careful reading of Cervantes' classic, a work which represents the origin of the modern novel and remains the fundamental book of Hispanic culture. The course will focus upon the text of Don Quijote, studied in the social, cultural and intellectual context of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4309 Mexican Literature

Conducted in Spanish. This course will focus on a specific time period, literary movement, genre, or major author in Mexican literature. Topics will vary. May be repeated once when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 or SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4311 Probs in Teaching of Span

Conducted in Spanish. Study of the linguistic principles, methodological theories, and classroom techniques conducive to effective and efficient teaching of Spanish as a native or second language. Recommended for prospective teachers.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 or equivalent course.

SPAN 4312 History of Spanish Language

Conducted in Spanish. This course is an introduction to the history and development of the Spanish language from its origins to the present day. Topics may include: Spanish in relation to Latin and other Romance languages; basic principles of language change; analysis of the stages of the evolution of Spanish since the Ancient Latin period taking into account influences of other cultures and languages; and analysis of American Spanish and Peninsular Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4314 Spanish Literature Before 1500

Conducted in Spanish. Will feature selected studies of the complete versions of major Spanish medieval texts including El Cid, El Conde Lucanor, El libro de Buen Amor and the Celestina.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4315 Spanish Lit of the Golden Age

Conducted in Spanish. Will feature selected authorial, generic or thematic studies of the complete versions of major Spanish Golden Age texts, featuring the picaresque and exemplary novels, the Romancero, Baroque poetry, and the drama of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina and Cálderon de la Barca.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instuctor.

SPAN 4316 Studies in Language

A special topics seminar in some aspect of the study of language. The course may focus on a special problem in linguistics, heritage languages, second language acquisition, history of the language, literacy, the teaching of the language or language policy and implementation. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours Sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4317 Hispanic Folklore

Conducted in Spanish. A survey of Hispanic folklore. Examination of the principal genres of folklore as found in Spain, Spanish America and the Hispanic Southwest.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4320 Span Am Lit: 20th Century

An introduction to the major literary expressions of Spanish America during the XX Century, in which selected works of novel, short story, poetry and drama will be studied. Students will read and examine representative works of authors such as Rivera, Bombal, Vargas Llosa, García Márquez, Borges, Cortázar, Bosch, Neruda, Guillén, Burgos, Dragún, Buenaventura. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4330 Special Topics in Span Lit&Cul

Conducted in Spanish. This course may focus on selected author, historical periods, literary movements, genres, themes or cultural issues in the Spanish literature. Course may also cover any aspect of Spanish culture or Transatlantic approaches to Hispanic cultural production other than literature including but not limited to film, folklore, music, popular culture, visual culture, etc. in any time period. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of the instructor.

SPAN 4335 Special Top in Hisp Lit&Cult

Conducted in Spanish. This course may focus on selected author, historical periods, literary movements, genres, themes or cultural issues in the Transatlantic approaches to Hispanic culture and literature. Course covers productions from literature to film, journalism, music, popular culture, visual culture, etc. in any time period. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3310.

SPAN 4340 Special Topics in Span Am Lit

Conducted in Spanish. This course may focus on selected author, historical periods, literary movements, genres, themes or cultural issues in Spanish American literature. Course may also cover any aspect of Spanish American Culture or Transatlantic approaches to Hispanic cultural production other than literature including but not limited to film, folklore, music, popular culture, visual culture, etc. in any time period. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305 and SPAN 3310 or consent of the instructor.

SPAN 4350 Intro to Span-Engl Translation

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze and resolve translation problems of short texts, while developing practical translation skills. (Cross listed with TRAN 4350)

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and SPAN 3300.

SPAN 4360 Intermediate Span>Engl Trans

An orientation to the theory and practice of translation from Spanish to English, including consideration of cultural and morpho-syntactical problems. Students learn to apply translation techniques and strategies to resolve language-specific translation problems, while practicing the translation of longer texts in the areas of literature, medicine and the law. (Cross listed with TRAN 4360)

Prerequisites: SPAN/TRAN 3350 or SPAN/TRAN 3351.

SPAN 4361 Intermediate Eng>Span Trans

An orientation to the theory and practice of translation from English to Spanish, including consideration of cultural and morpho-syntactical problems. Students learn to apply translation techniques and strategies to resolve language-specific translation problems, while practicing the translation of longer texts in the areas of literature, medicine and the law. (Cross listed with TRAN 4361)

Prerequisites: SPAN/TRAN 3350 or SPAN/TRAN 3351.

SPAN 4370 Text Analysis

Analysis of structural units contributing to the meaning of Spanish and English language texts at different levels: individual words, syntactic forms, paragraphs, etc. Examination of various categories of texts with special focus on text-specific terminology, figurative language, idiomatic expressions, and cultural allusions. Practice of same language translation, summaries, précis, and renderings at different levels of formality. Prerequisite/

Corequisites: SPAN 4350 or 4351.

SPAN 4371 Hispanic Culture

This course provides contemporary perspectives on Hispanic cultures in an approach to understanding the Hispanic world, its customs, attitudes, and values as they relate to intercultural communication. Students will achieve familiarity with the major Hispanic figures in history, the arts, political events, and social and religious institutions. Prerequisite/

Corequisites: SPAN 4350 or 4351.

SPAN 4373 Undergraduate Research

A course adapted to the directed study of topics in Spanish. Advanced students will develop a project in cooperation with an instructor. The project will be established by the student with the approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated with a change in project, but total credit cannot exceed eight semester hours.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

SPAN 4390 Span for Professional Purposes

Conducted in Spanish. This course is designed to help students become more proficient in communicating in Spanish about different professions or fields of study. The course introduces specialized vocabulary and technical writing necessary to function in many areas of the professional world.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305.

SPAN 4397 International Service Learning

This course seeks to engage students in activities that combine both academic learning and community service in a foreign country. Students participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community needs. Students are required to reflect on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. Final service projects must be presented to a broad audience. May be combined with Study Abroad and may be conducted in English, Spanish or Portuguese. Faculty supervisor required.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

SPAN 4398 Creative Writing

Conducted in Spanish. This course explores current theory and creative writing techniques through the study of required readings and the application of techniques in students' own work. Genres covered will regularly include poetry, fiction, and screenwriting, with drama, children's literature, non-fiction and other genres offered occasionally. This course may be repeated for credit but no more than twice in the same genre.

Prerequisites: SPAN 3305, or SPAN 2307, or ENGL 2307, or consent of instructor.

SPAN 4399 Senior Seminar

The senior seminar is a special topics capstone course required of all Spanish majors. Course readings, class discussions, and papers will focus on a highly defined issue in the study of literature or language. All senior seminars, however, will require that students develop and demonstrate command of the research process and superior writing skills. Attention will also be paid to professional post-collegiate issues of relevance to Spanish majors.

Prerequisites: At least 21 semester credit hours in Spanish.

TRAN 3350 Intro to Span>Engl Translation

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education, and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze and resolve translation problems of short texts, while developing practical translation skills. (Cross listed with SPAN 3350)

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and SPAN 3300.

TRAN 3351 Intro to English>Spanish Trans

Introduction to techniques for written and sight translation in a variety of text categories relating to nursing, advertising, commerce, education and politics. Provides students with the tools to identify, analyze, and resolve basic translation problems of short texts, while developing practical translation skills. (Cross listed with SPAN 3351).

Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 and SPAN 3300.

TRAN 4360 Intermediate Span>Engl Trans

An orientation to the theory and practice of translation from Spanish to English, including consideration of cultural and morpho-syntactical problems. Students learn to apply translation techniques and strategies to resolve language-specific translation problems, while practicing the translation of longer texts in the areas of literature, medicine and the law. (Cross listed with SPAN 4360)

Prerequisites: SPAN/TRAN 3350 or SPAN/TRAN 3351.

TRAN 4361 Inter Engl - Span Trans

An orientation to the theory and practice of translation from English to Spanish, including consideration of cultural and morpho-syntactical problems. Students learn to apply translation techniques and strategies to resolve language-specific translation problems, while practicing the translation of longer texts in the areas of literature, medicine, and the law. (Cross listed with SPAN 4361)

Prerequisites: TRAN 4350 or TRAN 4351.