Engineering

COSC 1136 Funds of Programming Lab

Laboratory course to accompany COSC 1336. Laboratory exercises reinforce the particular paradigms that are stressed in COSC 1336. Students will develop and run functional programs that solve elementary algorithmic problems. Students will also gain experience with compiling, finding, correcting syntax errors, and executing programs. This course places importance on scientific communication and collaboration methods.

Corequisites: COSC 1336.

COSC 1137 Object-Oriented Program Lab

Laboratory course to accompany COSC 1337. Laboratory exercises reinforce the particular paradigms that are stressed in COSC 1337. Students will develop programs in an object-oriented programming language by practicing the use of a variety of abstract data types and data structures. Students will also gain experience on using advanced design tools and the skills to analyze, debug and correct errors in programs. This course places importance on scientific communication and collaboration methods.

Prerequisites: COSC 1336.

Corequisites: COSC 1337.

COSC 1336 Fundamentals of Programming

Introduces the fundamental concepts of a high‐level programming language and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for STEM majors. Topics include data types, flow of control, functions, I/O streams, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course assumes computer literacy. This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Systems Engineering and Mathematics. Co‐requisite: COSC 1136.

TCCN: COSC 1315

COSC 1337 Object Oriented Programming

A continuation of COSC 1336. Emphasis is placed upon applying the object-oriented paradigms to develop the skills in data abstraction and object design where language features, essential programming techniques, and design guidelines are presented from a unified point of view.

Prerequisites: COSC 1336.

Corequisites: COSC 1137.

COSC 2301 Fundamentals of Comp Sci

Introduces fundamental concepts of programming from algorithmic and object-oriented perspectives. Topics include the range of introductory algorithmic concepts and constructs, simple data types, control structures, and introduction to array and string data structures, as well as debugging techniques and the social implications of computing. Emphasizes good software engineering principles and developing fundamental programming skills both in a language independent manner and in the context of a language that supports the object-oriented paradigm. High school BCIS is encouraged. Students should have sufficient abilities in high school mathematics.

Prerequisites: No programming or computer science experience is required.

COSC 2330 Digital Logic Design

Hardware implementation of arithmetic and logical functions, organization and design of digital systems.

COSC 3301 Algorithms&Data Structures

Builds on the foundation provided by COSC 1136/1336 and COSC 1137/1337 with an increased emphasis on algorithms, data structures, and software engineering. The treatment of programming concepts will be both in terms of the object-oriented paradigm as well as independent of any programming language.

Prerequisites: COSC 1137 and COSC 1337.

COSC 3310 Algorithm Design&Analysis

Introduces formal techniques to support the design and analysis of algorithms focusing on both the underlying mathematical theory and practical considerations of efficiency. Topics include asymptotic complexity bounds, techniques of analysis, algorithmic strategies, and an introduction to automata theory and its application to language translation.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301 and MATH 3365.

COSC 3320 Computer Architecture

Introduces the organization and architecture of computer systems, beginning with the standard von Neumann model and then moving forward to more recent architectural concepts.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301.

COSC 3326 Operating Systems & Networking

Introduces the fundamentals of operating systems together with those of networking and communications.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301 and MATH 3365.

COSC 3340 Microprocessor Systems

Basic computer structure, the instruction set, addressing modes, assembly language programming, assembly language subroutines, arithmetic operations, programming in C, implementation of C procedures, elementary data structures, input and output and a survey of microprocessor design.

Prerequisites: COSC 2330.

COSC 3350 Human Computer Interaction

Presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles and techniques of human-computer interaction.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301 and MATH 3365.

COSC 3370 Databases

Introduces the concepts and techniques and database systems. Topics include information models and systems; database systems; data modeling to include conceptual, object-oriented and relational data models; relational databases; database query languages to include SQL and OQL; relational database design; transaction processing; distributed databases; and physical database design.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301 and MATH 3365.

COSC 3390 Software Development

Provides an intensive implementation-oriented introduction to the software-development techniques used to create medium-scale interactive applications, focusing on the use of large object-oriented libraries to create well-designed graphical use interfaces. Topics include event-driven programming, computer graphics, human-computer interaction (HCI), and graphical user interfaces.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301 and MATH 3365.

COSC 4152 Internship in Computer Science

A directed internship in a public/private organization that is appropriate to the student's career objective or desire in a computer science setting. Students will apply analytical and technical knowledge acquired in the program in a real world setting and receive on-the-job training experience. Seminar and training will be held to discuss field experience from theoretical and applied perspective.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and advisor.

COSC 4252 Internship in Computer Science

A directed internship in a public/private organization that is appropriate to the student's career objective or desire in a computer science setting. Students will apply analytical and technical knowledge acquired in the program in a real world setting and receive on-the-job training experience. Seminar and training will be held to discuss field experience from theoretical and applied perspective.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and advisor.

COSC 4302 Software Engr&Proj Develop II

Continuation of COSC 4301 to work on the software project initiated in the prior semester.

Prerequisites: COSC 4301.

COSC 4310 Computer Security

Theory and practice of computer security. Cryptographic tools used to provide security, such as shared key encryption, public key encryption, key exchange and digital signature, with application to security in computer programs, operating systems, database management systems and networks.

Prerequisites: COSC 3326.

COSC 4320 Programming Languages

Formal definition of programming languages including specification of syntax and semantics. Precedence, infix, prefix and postfix notation. Global properties of algorithmic languages. List processing, string manipulation, data description and simulation languages. Run-time representation of program and data structures.

Prerequisites: COSC 3301.

COSC 4340 Intelligent Systems

Introduction to methods for the analysis and design of intelligent engineering systems. Topics include reinforcement learning, optimal estimation, Bayesian networks, expert systems, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Applications emphasize control and decision making in engineering, finance, and computer science. Cross listed with SENG 4340.

Prerequisites: SENG 3340.

COSC 4352 Internship in Computer Science

A directed internship in a public/private organization that is appropriate to the student's career objective or desire in a computer science setting. Students will apply analytical and technical knowledge acquired in the program in a real world setting and receive on-the-job training experience. Seminar and training will be held to discuss field experience from theoretical and applied perspective.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and advisor.

COSC 4385 Special Topics in Comp Science

Topics may be from an area of computer science. May be repeated when topic changes

COSC 4390 Comp Science Senior Dsgn Proj

This capstone course provides students the experience of implementing (including building, testing, and documenting) the approved project in COSC 4301, within budget and on schedule. Requires integration of knowledge from required systems engineering courses. Course requirements include a written report and oral presentation. To be taken during the semester of graduation.

Prerequisites: COSC 4301.

COSC 4395 Undergraduate Research

Students work on a computer science research project. The topic is chosen by the student and approved by the instructor. Course may be repeated under different topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department.

COSC 4452 Internship in Computer Science

A directed internship in a public/private organization that is appropriate to the student's career objective or desire in a computer science setting. Students will apply analytical and technical knowledge acquired in the program in a real world setting and receive on-the-job training experience. Seminar and training will be held to discuss field experience from theoretical and applied perspective.

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and advisor.

CSCE 1136 Funds of Programming Lab

Laboratory course to accompany CSCE 1336. Laboratory exercises reinforce the particular paradigms that are stressed in CSCE 1336. Students will develop and run functional programs that solve elementary algorithmic problems. Students will also gain experience with compiling, finding, correcting syntax errors, and executing programs. This course places importance on scientific communication and collaboration methods.

Corequisites: CSCE 1336.

CSCE 1137 Object-Oriented Program Lab

Laboratory course to accompany CSCE 1337. Laboratory exercises reinforce the particular paradigms that are stressed in CSCE 1337. Students will develop programs in an object-oriented programming language by practicing the use of a variety of abstract data types and data structures. Students will also gain experience on using advanced design tools and the skills to analyze, debug and correct errors in programs. This course places importance on scientific communication and collaboration methods.

Prerequisites: CSCE 1336 and CSCE 1136.

Corequisites: CSCE 1337.

CSCE 1336 Fundamentals of Programming

Introduces the fundamental concepts of a high‐level programming language and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for STEM majors. Topics include data types, flow of control, functions, I/O streams, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging. This course assumes computer literacy.

Corequisites: CSCE 1136

CSCE 1337 Object Oriented Programming

A continuation of CSCE 1336. Emphasis is placed upon applying the object-oriented paradigms to develop the skills in data abstraction and object design where language features, essential programming techniques, and design guidelines are presented from a unified point of view.

Prerequisites: CSCE 1136 and CSCE 1336.

Corequisites: CSCE 1137.

CSCE 2330 Digital Logic Design

Hardware implementation of arithmetic and logical functions, organization and design of digital systems.

CSCE 3301 Algorithms & Data Structures

Builds on the foundation provided by CSCE 1336 and CSCE 1337 with an increased emphasis on algorithms, data structures, and software engineering. The treatment of programming concepts will be both in terms of the object-oriented paradigm as well as independent of any programming language.

Prerequisites: CSCE 1137 and CSCE 1337.

CSCE 3314 Electronic Devices & Apps

Theory and application of solid state electronic devices. Physical principles of carrier motion in semiconductors leading to operating principles and circuit models for diodes, bipolar transistors, and field effect transistors. Applying the skills in designing amplifiers and op-amp based circuits.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2305

CSCE 3320 Signals and Systems

Introduction to the continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems; time domain characterization of linear time-invariant systems; Fourier analysis; filtering; sampling; modulation techniques for communication systems.

Prerequisites: CSCE 2330

CSCE 3326 Operating Systems & Networking

Introduces the fundamentals of operating systems together with those of networking and communications.

Prerequisites: MATH 3365.

CSCE 3340 Microprocessor Systems

Basic computer structure, the instruction set, addressing modes, assembly language programming, assembly language subroutines, arithmetic operations, programming in C, implementation of C procedures, elementary data structures, input and output and a survey of microprocessor based design.

Prerequisites: CSCE 2330

CSCE 3390 Software Development

Provides an intensive implementation-oriented introduction to the software-development techniques used to create medium-scale interactive applications, focusing on the use of large object- oriented libraries to create well-designed graphical use interfaces. Topics include event-driven programming, computer graphics, human-computer interaction (HCI), and graphical user interfaces.

Prerequisites: CSCE 1337, CSCE 1137, and MATH 3365

CSCE 4101 Soft Eng & Proj DevelopI Lab

Laboratory course to accompany CSCE 4201. Laboratory exercises help students to gather and document the requirements of the project that is defined in CSCE 4201. Students will also develop and document a design solution for the project. This course places importance on scientific communication and collaboration methods.

Prerequisites: CSCE 3301.

Corequisites: CSCE 4201.

CSCE 4201 Software Engnr&Proj Develop I

Principles of software engineering, design, and their applications in the development of a two-semester software project. Students work in teams to gather projects’ requirements, design a solution, and implement their design. The students also practice good project management using state-of-the-art software engineering processes. At the beginning of the first semester, projects are defined by the instructor and their requirements are documented by the teams. The students then work on designing and implementing their solutions in the remaining period of the first semester and the proceeding semester, culminating in a formal presentation of the results at the end of CSCE 4302. This course should be taken the semester preceding CSCE 4302.

Prerequisites: CSCE 3301.

Corequisites: CSCE 4101.

CSCE 4203 Dig Electronic Circuit Design

Theory of digital and electronics circuits. Digital logic families TTL, IIL, ECL, NMOS, CMOS, and GaAs. Large signal models for transistors. The course includes the study of the MOS device, critical interconnect and gate characteristics that determine the performance of VLSI circuits, using CADENCE VLSI tools.

Prerequisites: CSCE 2330 and CSCE 3314

CSCE 4210 Computer Engineering Design

This course emphasizes hardware design and debugging. Topics include combinational and sequential logic design using VHDL based upon PLA/PLD.

Prerequisites: CSCE 2330 and CSCE 3340

CSCE 4214 Data Communication

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer communication networks. Topics include the OSI reference model, the physical, data link, network, and transport layers, TCP/IP, network topologies, routing and flow control.

Prerequisites: CSCE 2330

CSCE 4220 Programming Languages

The study of programming language design including syntax, semantics, behavior, and implementation issues in imperative, functional, logic, and object-oriented languages. Topics may include type theory, concurrency, data dependency, and nondeterminism.

Prerequisites: CSCE 1337 and CSCE 3301

CSCE 4240 Intro to Unmanned Aerial Vehic

Overview of unmanned aerial systems: history, platforms, operations, command and control, sensor systems, payloads, regulations, policy. Review of Communications, Roles of Satellites, Image Capturing, Airframe and Propulsion Components, Stability and Control. Current developments in unmanned aerial systems and its relevance to border security.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing or approval of instructor.

CSCE 4301 Software Engnr&Proj Develop I

Principles of software engineering, design, and their applications in the development of a two-semester software project. Students work in teams to gather projects’ requirements, design a solution, and implement their design. The students also practice good project management using state-of-the-art software engineering processes. At the beginning of the first semester, projects are defined by the instructor and their requirements are documented by the teams. The students then work on designing and implementing their solutions in the remaining period of the first semester and the proceeding semester, culminating in a formal presentation of the results at the end of CSCE 4302. This course should be taken the semester preceding CSCE 4302.

Prerequisites: CSCE 3301.

Corequisites: CSCE 4101.

CSCE 4302 Software Engr&Proj Develop II

Continuation of CSCE 4301 to work on the software project initiated in the prior semester.

Prerequisites: CSCE 4301

CSCE 4310 Computer Security

Fundamental concepts and principles of computer security, operating system and network security, private key and public key cryptographic algorithms, hash functions, authentication, firewalls and intrusion detection systems, IPSec and VPN, wireless and web security.

Prerequisites: Senior standing or approval of instructor

CSCE 4315 Embedded Systems

Characteristics of embedded systems, microprocessors and microcontrollers, system design, modular programming, interface devices, memory management, interrupts, input/output applications, multitasking, and simulation. Interchangeable with SENG 4315.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2305 and CSCE 1336 or COSC 1336.

CSCE 4320 Computer System Architecture

I/O organization, memory organization including virtual memory, cache memory mapping, pipelining, and multiprocessing, CISC and RISC microprocessors.

Prerequisites: CSCE 2330 and CSCE 3320

CSCE 4350 Comp Approach to Crim Justice

Statistical and algorithmic methods in criminal justice system, predictive policing, sentencing, applications of this approach to real-time risk assessments for bail decisions and tests for discrimination in traffic stops.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing or approval of instructor

CSCE 4390 Comp Eng Senior Design Project

This capstone course provides students the experience of implementing (including building, testing, and documenting) a project, within budget and on schedule. Course requirements include a written report and oral presentation. To be taken during the semester of graduation.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing

CSCE 4395 Undergraduate Research

Students work on a computer engineering research project. The topic is chosen by the student and approved by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department

ENGR 1201 Foundations of Engineering I

Introduction to the engineering profession and disciplines; development of skills in problem solving including numbers, units, graphs and error calculation; drawing and design using CAD tools; students work in teams on an engineering design project, including construction, testing and reporting.

Corequisites: MATH 2413.

TCCN: ENGR 1201

ENGR 1202 Foundations of Engineering II

Introduction to engineering ethics and professional responsibilities; development of skills in problem solving, analysis, estimation, design, and teamwork; introduction to systems engineering; computational analysis, computer programming applications. Students work in teams on an engineering design project, including construction, testing, and reporting.

Prerequisites: ENGR 1201 and MATH 2413.

ENGR 1204 Engineering Graphics

Orthographical and isometric drawings. Tolerance, working drawings, three dimensional pictorials, primary and successive auxiliary view and vector graphics. Computer aided design software is used for drawing and development of systems in mechanical, electrical and welding applications.

Prerequisites: ENGR 1201.

TCCN: ENGR 1204

ENGR 1211 Foundations of Engineering I

Introduction to the engineering profession, ethics and disciplines, development of skills in teamwork, problem solving, logic processing, design and drawing; emphasis on computing applications and CAD tools.

Corequisites: MATH 2413.

ENGR 1230 Principles of Innov & Creativ

Introduction to creativity and creative problem solving techniques, innovation strategies, collective thinking in engineering. Students will be able to use a “whole-brain” approach to the study of engineering.

ENGR 2103 Eng Mech Statics & Dynamic Lab

Laboratory course to accompany ENGR 2303. Laboratory exercises reinforce ENGR2303 lecture material and place importance on scientific communication and collaboration.

Corequisites: ENGR 2303.

ENGR 2105 Principles of Elec Engr Lab

Laboratory course to accompany ENGR 2305. Laboratory exercises reinforce ENGR2305 lecture material and place importance on scientific collaboration.

Corequisites: ENGR 2305.

TCCN: ENGR 2105

ENGR 2236 Programming for Engineers

Introduction of the foundation of programming, software engineering, debugging, and using existing computational codes in the context of controlling physical equipment, gathering experimental data, and visualizing results. The course will be taught using suitable programming languages (i.e., C++, MATLAB, Python), which provides a balance between access to physical devices and modern programming concepts. Pre-requisite: MATH 2414

ENGR 2303 Statics & Dynamics

Application of the fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics to the statics and dynamics of particles and the equilibrium of trusses, frames, beams and other rigid bodies. Dynamics of moving particles, including friction, torque, impulse, and momentum.

Prerequisites: PHYS 2325, PHYS 2125, and MATH 2414.

Corequisites: ENGR 2103.

TCCN: ENGR 2303

ENGR 2305 Principles of Elec Engineering

Fundamentals of electrical circuit analysis, AC power and electronics, intended as a terminal course in these areas for most engineering disciplines.

Prerequisites: PHYS 2326 and ENGR 1202.

Corequisites: ENGR 2105.

TCCN: ENGR 2305

ENGR 2312 Cons Prin in Thermal Sci

Theory and applications of energy methods in engineering; conservation principles to investigate "traditional" thermodynamics and internal flow fluids.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2321, MATH 2415 or registration therein.

ENGR 2315 Principles of Elec Engineering

Fundamentals of electrical circuit analysis, AC power and electronics, intended as a terminal course in these areas for most engineering disciplines.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2321, PHYS 2326/2126.

ENGR 2321 Statics and Particle Dynamics

Application of the fundamental principles of Newtonian mechanics to the statics and dynamics of particles and the equilibrium of trusses, frames, beams and other rigid bodies.

Prerequisites: PHYS 2326/2126.

Corequisites: MATH 2415.

ENGR 2372 Engineering Statistics

This course will cover a variety of important topics in probability and statistics such as pictorial and tabular methods in descriptive statistics, measures of location, measures of variability, samples spaces and events, axioms and properties of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability, independence, discrete random variables and probability distributions, continuous random variables and probability distributions, joint probability distributions and random samples. The course will also demonstrate how Microsoft Excel can be used to conduct statistical analysis such as basic simple and multiple regression.

Prerequisites: MATH 2414.

ENGR 2376 Cons Prin in Thermal Engr

Theory and applications of energy methods in engineering; conservation principles to investigate "traditional" thermodynamics and internal flow fluids; material properties.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2303, MATH 2415 or registration therein.

ENGR 2380 Fluid Mechanics

Study of fluid at rest and in-motion. Topics covered in the course include fluid properties, pressures, hydrostatics, buoyance, open system, control volume approach to conservation of mass, moment and energy. Applications includes fluid flow through pipes, dimensionless analysis, boundary layers, and lift and drag acting on object.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2376.

ENGR 2390 Mechanics of Materials

Principle of material mechanics in engineering problems addressing strength and stiffness of different solid material. The course includes topics in continuum stress and strain, torsion of circular shaft, beam bending, and combined stresses applied to an object.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2303.

ENGR 3231 The Engineer as an Innovator

Mentally and physically develop creative thinking skills, use creativity to generate ideas and solve problems, learn how to organize teams, avoid roadblocks to team creativity, and use the creative problem-solving process.

Prerequisites: ENGR 1230.

ENGR 3300 Engineering Economics

Principles of engineering economics including economic equivalence, time value of money, analysis of single and multiple investments, comparison of alternatives; capital recovery and tax implications; certainty; uncertainty; risk analysis; public sector analysis and break-even concepts. Interchangeable with SENG 3300.

Prerequisites: MATH 2414.

ENGR 3301 Engineering Ethics

Emphasis is placed on the developing techniques of moral/ethical analysis and their application to real and hypothetical ethical issues encountered by engineers, such as: professional employee rights and whistle blowing; environmental issues; ethical aspects of safety, risk and liability, and conflicts of interest.

Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

EPSC 1170 Survey of Earth Science Lab

Laboratory course to accompany EPSC 1370. Must be taken concurrently with EPSC 1370. Laboratory fee applicable.

TCCN: GEOL 1101

EPSC 1370 Survey of Earth Science

A survey of the natural processes at work in the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere of the Earth, as well as Earth's place in the universe. Includes an introduction to astronomy, geology, oceanography, and meteorology. Designed to fulfill laboratory science core curriculum requirements. Must be taken concurrently with EPSC 1170.

TCCN: GEOL 1301

EPSC 2101 Atmospheric Science-Lab

Laboratory course to accompany EPSC 2301. Practical exercises reinforce EPSC 2301 lecture material. Topics will include structure, energy, and motions of the atmosphere; climate; fronts and cyclones; atmospheric stability; clouds and precipitation; severe storms. Must be taken concurrently with EPSC 2301. Laboratory fee applicable.

TCCN: GEOL 1147

EPSC 2301 Atmospheric Science

Structure, energy, and motions of the atmosphere; climate; fronts and cyclones; atmospheric stability; clouds and precipitation; severe storms.

TCCN: GEOL 1347

GEOL 1103 Intro to Physical Geology Lab

Laboratory course to accompany GEOL 1303. Must be taken concurrently with GEOL 1303. Laboratory fee applicable.

TCCN: GEOL 1103

GEOL 1105 Environmental Geology Lab

Laboratory course to accompany GEOL 1305. Must be taken concurrently with GEOL 1305. Laboratory fee applicable.

TCCN: GEOL 1105

GEOL 1303 Intro to Physical Geology

An introductory study of Earth's composition, structure, and internal and external physical processes. Designed to fulfill laboratory science core curriculum requirements. Must be taken concurrently with GEOL 1103.

TCCN: GEOL 1303

GEOL 1305 Environmental Geology

An introductory study of Earth's major resources, including the atmosphere, water, minerals, energy, and biological systems as they relate to the impact of urban development and environmental control. Designed to fulfill laboratory science core curriculum requirements. Must be taken concurrently with GEOL 1105.

TCCN: GEOL 1305

GEOL 3320 Petroleum Geology

Origin, migration and accumulation of petroleum; typical U.S. oil and gas fluids and studies in subsurface geology.

Prerequisites: GEOL 1303/1103.

GEOL 3401 Earth Mats: Minerals & Rocks

An examination of minerals, and rocks; their formation and economic significance. Includes three hours of lab per week. Laboratory fee applicable.

Prerequisites: GEOL 1303/1103 or EPSC 1370/1170.

GEOL 3405 Geohydrology

A study of surface and subsurface hydrology emphasizing geological controls on groundwater flow; quantitative methods of analyzing aquifer systems; regional hydrology; water quality and pollution. Includes three hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee applicable.

Prerequisites: Eight hours of Geology.

GEOL 3415 Sedimentology & Stratigraphy

Origin of sediments and sedimentary rocks; transport, deposition, and depositional environments for sediments; field and laboratory studies in description and interpretation of sedimentary rocks; principles of stratigraphy; geologic time and correlation; and sequence stratigraphy. Includes three hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee applicable.

GEOL 3425 Paleontology and Earth History

An examination of the geologic history of the Earth focusing on the fossil and rock record. Specifically, this course will consider the development and history of life as documented by the fossil record and earth's history from a stratigraphic perspective. Includes three hours of laboratory per week. Laboratory fee applicable.

Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

GEOL 4170 Geology Seminar

A discussion of research and current topics in the geological sciences.

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4173 UG Res in Geosciences

A course adapted to the study of special topics in the geosciences. For advanced students capable of developing a problem independently through conference and research (field and/or laboratory based) directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with approval of the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated not to exceed four semester credit hours total. Laboratory fee, if applicable. (Formerly EPSC 4173-3373)

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4199 Special Topics in Geosciences

A course involving instruction in geology depending on student interest and specialty of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee, if applicable.

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4273 UG Res in Geosciences

A course adapted to the study of special topics in the geosciences. For advanced students capable of developing a problem independently through conference and research (field and/or laboratory based) directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with approval of the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated not to exceed four semester credit hours total. Laboratory fee, if applicable. (Formerly EPSC 4173-3373)

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4299 Special Topics in Geosciences

A course involving instruction in geology depending on student interest and specialty of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee, if applicable.

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4373 UG Res in Geosciences

A course adapted to the study of special topics in the geosciences. For advanced students capable of developing a problem independently through conference and research (field and/or laboratory based) directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with approval of the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated not to exceed four semester credit hours total. (Formerly EPSC 4173-4473)

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4399 Special Topics in Geosciences

A course involving instruction in geology depending on student interest and specialty of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee, if applicable.

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4460 Intro to Geographic Info Sys

This course will explore fundamental concepts of geographic information technologies with a focus on applications within the geosciences and natural sciences in general. Students will be exposed to the power of geographic information systems to elucidate complex problems. (Cross-listed with BIOL 4460 and BIOL 5460)

Prerequisites: Senior standing.

GEOL 4473 UG Res in Geosciences

A course adapted to the study of special topics in the geosciences. For advanced students capable of developing a problem independently through conference and research (field and/or laboratory based) directed by the instructor. Problem chosen by the student with approval of the instructor prior to registration. May be repeated not to exceed four semester credit hours total. Laboratory fee, if applicable. (Formerly EPSC 4173-3373)

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

GEOL 4499 Special Topics in Geosciences

A course involving instruction in geology depending on student interest and specialty of instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Laboratory fee, if applicable.

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Geology.

PETE 3101 Drilling Engineering I Lab

Preparation, testing and control of rotary drilling fluid systems. API recommended diagnostic testing of drilling fluids for measuring the physical properties of drilling fluids, cements and additives. A laboratory study of the functions and applications of drilling and well completion fluids. Learning the rig floor simulator for drilling operations that virtually resembles the drilling and well control exercises.

Corequisites: PETE 3301

PETE 3110 Res Rock & Fluid Propert Lab

Experimental study of oil reservoir rocks and fluids and their interrelation applied to petroleum reservoir engineering.

Corequisites: PETE 3310

PETE 3111 Formation Evaluation Lab

Observation of well logging tools and recording devices; Laboratory investigation of core analysis (routine core, special core, and thin section) for different formations. Interpretation of borehole surveys to determine formation character, fluid content, and production potential. Measurement of electrical, radioactive, acoustic, magnetic properties of rocks and fluids; The spontaneous potential log, gamma-ray log, porosity logs, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log, and caliper log. Formation evaluation field-case studies using commercial software on different types of formations by interpretation of resistivity logs, spontaneous potential log, gamma-ray log, porosity logs, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log, and caliper log.

Corequisites: PETE 3311

PETE 3120 Petroleum Production Eng I Lab

Laboratory investigation of produced fluid treatment and separation problems. Engineering solutions to petroleum production problems. Investigation of multiphase flow and pipeline fluid flow. Petroleum production system analysis using commercial simulator.

Corequisites: PETE 3320

PETE 3300 Petroleum Economics

Principles of engineering economics including economic equivalence, time value of money, analysis of single and multiple investments, comparison of alternatives; public sector analysis and break-even concept; estimation of oil and gas reserves and their uncertainty including tangible and intangible investment costs, depreciation, economic analysis of producing wells, income tax consideration; probabilistic determination of different prospects; petroleum project economics, risk and uncertainty analysis, property evaluation and management; economic factors affecting petroleum production and investment opportunities.

Prerequisites: MATH 2414

PETE 3301 Drilling Engineering I

Introduction to petroleum drilling systems, including fundamental petroleum engineering concepts, quantities and unit systems, drilling rig components, drilling fluids, pressure loss calculations, casing, well cementing, and directional drilling.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2380, ENGR 2390, and GEOL 3320.

Corequisites: PETE 3101.

PETE 3307 Reservoir Engineering I

Fundamental properties of reservoir formations and fluids including reservoir volumetric, reservoir statics and dynamics. Analysis of Darcy's law and the mechanics of single and multiphase fluid flow through reservoir rock, capillary phenomena, material balance, and reservoir drive mechanisms.

Prerequisites: PETE 3310 and PETE 3311

PETE 3310 Res Rock & Fluid Properties

Introduction to basic reservoir rock and fluid properties and the interaction between rocks and fluids in a reservoir. The course is divided into three sections: rock properties, rock and fluid properties (interaction between rock and fluids), and fluid properties. The rock properties introduce the concepts of, Lithology of Reservoirs, Porosity and Permeability of Rocks, Darcy's Law, and Distribution of Rock Properties. While the Rock and Fluid Properties Section covers the concepts of, Existence of Multi-phases, Saturation, Wettability, Capillary Pressure, Effective and Relative Permeability. Furthermore, the Fluid properties topics include Phase Behavior of Single and Multi-Component Systems, Compositional and Black-Oil models, Solution Gas-Oil Ratios, Formation Volume Factor, Compressibility, Density, Viscosity, and Interfacial Tension.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2380 and GEOL 3320.

Corequisites: PETE 3110

PETE 3311 Formation Evaluation

This course covers topics on methods of how to measure and interpret the physical and chemical properties of formation through the well logging tools. Fundamental principles of the use of borehole surveys to evaluate the formation characteristics and fluid contents of porous strata; well-log interpretation for formation evaluation of hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs; basic rock physics principles; theory of tool operation; analysis of open-hole logs and core measurements to estimate hydrocarbon reserves and petrophysical properties of the formation such as porosity, net pay thickness, water/hydrocarbon saturation, permeability, and saturation-dependent capillary pressure; formation evaluation of clay-free and shaly-sand formations as well as basic introduction to formation evaluation of organic-shale formations. Measurement principles, test types, and application of wireline Formation Testing, Production logging; Core analysis techniques; Integration of core analysis; Well logging results for reservoir modeling.

Prerequisites: PHYS 2326, ENGR 2390, and GEOL 3320.

Corequisites: PETE 3111.

PETE 3320 Petroleum Production Eng I

Introduction to production operations, production systems, and oil field equipment; inflow performance analysis, effect of formation damage on well flow, nodal systems analysis; perforating techniques and their effect on inflow; and stimulation treatments to enhance well performance; production problems; Well stimulation design and workover and recompletion analysis. Design of surface separation and treating facilities.

Prerequisites: PETE 3307 and PETE 3310.

Corequisites: PETE 3120

PETE 3340 Geophysics for Petro Engineers

The fundamentals of geophysics are given to petroleum engineering students, with special emphasis on 2-D and 3-D seismic. Application of seismic to oil and gas exploration problems.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2380 and GEOL 3320

PETE 4190 Senior Eng Capstone Proposal

Introduction to principles of engineering design as applied to petroleum projects. This course is the first course in two courses series to develop the final capstone-engineering project focusing on shale oil and gas. The course focuses on the application of the concepts of reservoir, production, drilling and completions, and economics to petroleum engineering design projects. In this course, students will apply their gained knowledge to develop a proposal of their capstone design project. Alongside with the proposal students will develop the geological model of their selected formation to be used in the second course of the capstone design project. The class will be divided into teams and students will be evaluated based on their contribution to the team effort. All reports and presentations will be presented as a product of the team.

PETE 4290 Senior Eng Capstone Design

Integration of reservoir engineering and modeling for field development plan in unconventional formation. This course is the second course in two courses series to develop the final capstone-engineering project focusing on shale oil and gas. The course focuses on the testing and optimizing production design and strategy, drilling and completions, and economics of the pre-proposed project. In this course, students will apply their knowledge in reservoir modeling to test and optimize their capstone design to maximize its net present value. The class are divided into teams, each team must prepare a complete technical report of their project including all the conducted steps and results. Each group will present their project in form of a presentation and poster. Students will be evaluated based on their contribution to the team effort. All reports and presentations will be presented as a product of the team.

Prerequisites: Must be taken the semester prior to graduation

PETE 4302 Drilling Engineering II

This course addresses the current advancement and technologies applied in modern drilling designs. The course focuses on building and designing directional well paths, wellbore surveying methods, predicting dog-leg severity, bottom hole assembly and operational techniques used in directional drilling, limiting factors and wellbore issues associated with directional drilling.

Prerequisites: PETE 3301

PETE 4312 Reservoir Engineering II

Determination of reserves; material balance methods; aquifer models; fractional flow and frontal advance; displacement, pattern, and vertical sweep efficiencies in water floods; enhanced oil recovery processes; design of optimal recovery processes.

Prerequisites: PETE 3307

PETE 4313 Integrated Reservoir Mngt

Principles of reservoir management and applications to specific reservoirs. Examine case studies that include new fields, mature fields, water floods and enhanced recovery projects. Requirements for successful operation of a reservoir through integration of people, technology, tools and data, synergy, fostering teamwork and integration.

Prerequisites: PETE 4312

PETE 4321 Petroleum Production Eng. II

Fundamental production engineering design, evaluation and optimization for oil and gas wells, including well deliverability, formation damage and skin analysis, completion performance, and technologies that improve oil and gas well performance (artificial lift and well stimulation).

Prerequisites: PETE 3320.

PETE 4322 Artificial Lift

Fundamentals of artificial lift. Design, Evaluation and Optimization of different methods: Beam pumping, Electric submersible pumps and Gas lift. Equipment and installations required at the field. Case studies in different types of petroleum fields.

Prerequisites: PETE 3320

PETE 4332 Env Hlth & Saf in Oil Indus

This course analyzes U.S. laws, and how regulatory agencies address compliance concerns in the oil and gas industry. Attention will be paid to health, safety, and environmental concerns.

PETE 4355 Drilling Optimization

Optimization of the drilling process for oil and gas well based on geo-mechanical and dynamical models. Topics to be covered include drilling hydraulics, drill bit selection, operating parameter selection, analysis of drilling time and cost, and rate of penetration predications.

Prerequisites: PETE 4302

PETE 4370 Well Testing

Well test objectives and principles. Basics of Well Test Interpretation; Pressure transient tests and interpretation methods, unsteady-state fluid flow through porous rock, analysis of the drawdown and buildup tests, wellbore storage, application of pressure derivative in pressure transient data analysis, testing of hydraulically fractured wells, type curve methods, testing of horizontal wells, unified method of analysis, well test design, case studies of local field examples using well test commercial simulator; basics of specialized well test including Interference, pulse and vertical permeability testing, drill stem test (DST); Reservoir limit test; Wire line and slick line formation tests; Repeat formation tester (RFT).

Prerequisites: PETE 3307, PETE 3311, and PETE 3320

PETE 4380 Shale Oil & Gas Engineering

Overview of the unconventional basins and plays – North America, the rest of the world and Emerging basins; characteristics of unconventional oil and gas resources; unconventional resources workflow – exploration, identification, characterization, economics, efficient completion technologies, challenges, and development strategies. Pilot project in Shale resources development.

Prerequisites: PETE 3307 and PETE 3311

PETE 4382 Reserv Modeling & Simulation

Introduction to the fundamentals and applications of reservoir molding and simulation. In this class, numerical models are built based on finite-difference and finite-volume approximations of governing equations of fluid flow in porous media, which integrate conservation of mass, isothermal fluid PVT behavior, and Darcy's flow approximations.

Prerequisites: PETE 3307, PETE 3310, and PETE 3320

SENG 3300 Engineering Economics

Principles of engineering economics including economic equivalence, time value of money, analysis of single and multiple investments, comparison of alternatives; capital recovery and tax implications; certainty; uncertainty; risk analysis; public sector analysis and break-even concepts. Interchangeable with ENGR 3300.

Prerequisites: MATH 2414.

SENG 3301 Engr Proj Mgt & Proposals

Principles of project management; planning, scheduling, and control. Engineering proposals; technical reports. Students prepare proposals, including specifications, timelines, schedule, and budget, for projects to be implemented in SENG 4390. This course should be taken the semester preceding SENG 4390.

Prerequisites: ENGL 2311 and senior standing.

SENG 3310 Intro to Control Systems

Analysis and synthesis of controlled, dynamic, linear mechanical, electrical, fluid and/or thermal systems; introduction to concepts of stability, controllability, and observability. Optimal control systems and nonlinear control theory.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2305, MATH 3310, MATH 3330, COSC 1336 and COSC 1136.

SENG 3320 Engineering Modeling & Design

This course will cover the fundamentals of modeling and design, introduce students to engineering design criteria such as human factors and ergonomics, maintainability, and reliability. The course will also introduce students to project management topics such as project scheduling, schedule reduction, design and project selection models, and multi-criteria decision making. Contemporary case studies of failures in modeling and design will be analyzed to identify lessons learned.

Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

SENG 3330 Operations Research I

Introduction to the fundamental deterministic analytical methods and their applications to the industrial and systems engineering. Modeling and decision making. Methods include linear programming, the simplex method, integer programming, distribution and network models (transportation, transshipment, and assignment problems), nonlinear programming, queuing analysis, simulation, and forecasting.

Prerequisites: MATH 3310 and SENG 3320.

SENG 3337 Software Development

This course will cover advanced software development techniques including object-oriented programming, inheritance, polymorphism, formatted file access, recursion, functional and operator overloading, parsing using a FSM, stacks and queues using linked list, search algorithms using binary search trees, and shortest path algorithms.

Prerequisites: COSC 1336 and COSC 1136.

SENG 3340 Robotics and Automation

Study of the use, design, and deployment of industrial automation and robotics technologies in high-precision, multi-product manufacturing environments. Robot manipulators, kinematics and dynamics, robot automation and control, integrated robotic systems for manufacturing, automation in manufacturing, programmable logic controllers, applications to industrial systems.

Prerequisites: SENG 3310.

SENG 3370 Computer Int Manufacturing

Programmable automation applied to manufacturing systems. Sensors and data acquisition. Continuous and discrete control system design and analysis. Computer control of manufacturing processes and integration. Communications through local areas networks.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

SENG 3380 Measurements and Devices

Basic concepts and principles of measurement methods; characteristics of signals; signal conditioning; data acquisition and processing; transducers and sensors, analog and digital devices, voltage regulators; power supplies; measurements of temperature, pressure, velocity, flow, and strain.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2305/2105.

SENG 4152 Internship in Systems Engr

A directed internship in an organization appropriate to the student’s career objectives. May be repeated. Evaluation of performance is on a CR/NC basis.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4195 Undergraduate Research

Permits work on a research engineering project. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4199 Independent Study in SENG

A directed study course. Topics selected from contemporary developments in the field of systems engineering.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4252 Internship in Systems Engr

A directed internship in an organization appropriate to the student’s career objectives. May be repeated. Evaluation of performance is on a CR/NC basis.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4295 Undergraduate Research

Permits work on a research engineering project. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4299 Independent Study in SENG

A directed study course. Topics selected from contemporary developments in the field of systems engineering.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4301 Engr Project Mgt and Proposals

Principles of project management; planning, scheduling, and control. Engineering proposals; technical reports. Students prepare proposals, including specifications, timelines, schedule, and budget, for projects to be implemented in SENG 4390. This course should be taken the semester preceding SENG 4390. (Formerly SENG 3301)

Prerequisites: ENGL 2311 and senior standing.

SENG 4315 Embedded Systems

Characteristics of embedded systems, microprocessors and microcontrollers, system design, modular programming, interface devices, memory management, interrupts, input/output applications, multitasking, and simulation. Interchangable with CSCE 4315.

Prerequisites: ENGR 2305 and COSC 1336 or CSCE 1336.

SENG 4330 Operations Research II

This course will present mathematical models for inventory management. It also covers a variety of statistics topics such as analysis of variance (One Factor and Two Factors), simple and advanced multiple linear regression. Techniques to deal with collinearity in datasets such as stepwise regression and best subsets are presented. Other topics include game theory, Markov chains, and multi-criteria decision-making through goal programming

Prerequisites: ENGR 2372 and SENG 3330.

SENG 4340 Intelligent Systems

Introduction to methods for the analysis and design of intelligent engineering systems. Topics include reinforcement learning, optimal estimation, Bayesian networks, expert systems, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. Applications emphasize control and decision making in engineering, finance, and computer science.

Prerequisites: SENG 3340.

SENG 4350 Facilities Design & Logistics

Design and analysis of models and algorithms for facility location, vehicle routing, and facility layout problems. Emphasis will be placed on both the use of computers and the theoretical analysis of models and algorithms in the design of production/service facilities, sequencing, and scheduling. Fundamental concepts applied through a sequence of design projects.

Prerequisites: SENG 3330.

SENG 4352 Internship in Systems Engr

A directed internship in an organization appropriate to the student’s career objectives. May be repeated. Evaluation of performance is on a CR/NC basis.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4360 Systems Simulation

Study the structure, logic, methodologies, and computer techniques for simulating systems. Topics include fundamentals of discrete simulation, design-modeling and subsequent analysis, model verification and validation, and understanding and predicting the behavior of systems.

Prerequisites: SENG 3330.

SENG 4370 Intro to Virtual Manufacturing

Introduction to virtual manufacturing, virtual reality applications in manufacturing systems design, networked manufacturing applications, and modeling of occupational safety engineering.

Prerequisites: SENG 3370.

SENG 4380 Syst Eng in Oil and Gas Ind

Introduction to the interdisciplinary approach between two different engineering disciplines: Petroleum Engineering and Systems Engineering.

Prerequisites: Senior standing.

SENG 4385 Special Topics in Systems Engr

Topics may be from any area of systems engineering. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Senior standing or permission of instructor.

SENG 4390 Sys Eng Senior Design Project

This capstone course provides students the experience of implementing (including building, testing, and documenting) the approved project in SENG 3301, within budget and on schedule. Requires integration of knowledge from required systems engineering courses. Course requirements include a written report and oral presentation. To be taken during the semester of graduation.

Prerequisites: SENG 4301.

SENG 4395 Undergraduate Research

Permits work on research engineering project. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

SENG 4399 Independent Study in SENG

A directed study course. Topics selected from contemporary developments in the field of systems engineering.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.