Social Sciences

ANTH 2302 Introduction to Archaeology

The study of the human and material remains of previous civilizations humans left behind on or below the surface of the earth. Different theories of the interpretations of archaeological evidence are presented. In addition to course work, a field trip will be included.

TCCN: ANTH 2302

ANTH 2346 Introduction to Anthropology

This introductory course considers the emergence of humans, and traces the development of their physical characteristics and culture to the present. The course covers the four basic subfields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, physical anthropology, and archaeology.

TCCN: ANTH 2346

ANTH 3301 Urban Anthropology

A study of how humans adapt culturally and biologically to increasingly dense settlement patterns. Examines the process by which complex societies emerge, from ancient times to the present: the strategies humans use to cope with demands posed by urban environments; and a cross-cultural study of format and informal cultural use of urban space. (Cross-listed with URBS 3301).

ANTH 3302 Indians of North America

Survey of the archeology, history, culture, social organization, ecology, and contemporary conditions of the indigenous people of North America, including the Indians of Mexico. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of contact, resistance, and the reservation experience of Indians in Texas.

ANTH 3303 Biological Anthropology

Anthropology is the holistic study of humans and our culture. Biological anthropology, a sub-discipline of anthropology, is the study of human biological and cultural evolution. This course introduces foundational concepts pertaining to human evolution, including evolutionary theory, genetics, geology,paleontology, primatology, archaeology, and osteology. The course also covers the detailed history of the biocultural evolution of our species. This class also includes an extensive examination into the applied side of biological anthropology, particularly as it pertains to forensics and bioarcheology.

ANTH 3304 Lang, Culture and Oral Trad

Overview of the nature of language and a non-technical introduction to linguistic science, with major emphasis on language as the foundation of culture and on the role of oral tradition -- creative expression, memory, and ways of knowing -- in non-literate societies.

ANTH 3305 North American Archaeology

This course introduces students to the archaeology of North America by examining the different time periods and cultural areas. The latest archaeological interpretations and debates are provided to understand the peopling of the continent, the origins of North American agriculture, and the development of complex societies. The course also discusses significant archaeological interpretations of historical sites.

ANTH 3306 Cultural Change, Crisis&Dev

An examination of how humans adapt to change, with an emphasis on the impact of development of non-industrial societies. Issues include the impact of development at the household level, forced resettlement, environmental degradation, and cultural extinction. The underlying goal is to explore ways that anthropological methods and theories contribute to understanding and sovling problems facing human populations everywhere.

ANTH 3308 Latin American Cultures

The study of the impact of Spanish and Portuguese colonization upon the indigenous cultures and political economy of Latin America. Analysis of the development of new syncratic Latino cultural forms reflecting Iberian, Native American and African heritage in contemporary Central and South America and the Caribbean (Cross-listed with SOCI 3308).

ANTH 3351 Cultural Anthropology

Major aspects of culture (social organization, economics, religion, etc.); cultural patterns and sociocultural change; pre-history of humans and the development of variant cultures.

ANTH 4301 Special Topics in Anthropology

Selected topics in an identified area. May be repeated if topic changes. May be taken for graduate credit.

ANTH 4302 Myth, Magic and Religion

Why have humans populated their universe with unseen beings, imagined places, and supernatural powers? Why have they created elaborate rituals and mythic stories that must be believed in if human life is to prosper? Humans have been trying to find order and meaning in the universe for thousands of years, and their attempts to do so—belief in the supernatural, stories to explain the unknown, and all the types of the behaviors these manifest—are as diverse and creative as anything that can find in popular books and movies.

ANTH 4351 Cultural Anthropology

Major aspects of culture (social organization, economics, religion, etc); cultural patterns and sociocultural change; prehistory of humans and the development of variant cultures.

CRIJ 1301 Intro to Criminal Justice

An overview of the criminal justice system, with a focus on decision points and administrative practices in police, criminal court, and correctional bureaucracies. The historical evolution of criminal justice agencies is covered along with basic criminal procedures.

TCCN: CRIJ 1301

CRIJ 1306 Courts&Criminal Procedure

Survey of the U. S. judicial system with emphases on formal judicial procedures and institutional structures. Also, quasi-judicial and extra-judicial features are covered as well as principles of evidence that pertain to the criminal justice process including the nature and types of criminal evidence and admissibility of evidence in court. Interchangeable with PSCI 4326.

TCCN: CRIJ 1306

CRIJ 2313 Correctional Systems&Practice

An analysis and evaluation of contemporary correctional practices. Covers the history of penology, sentencing variations, and community and institutional corrections.

TCCN: CRIJ 2313

CRIJ 2328 Police Systems&Practices

A study of the history and social settings of the police, the police role and discretion, police administrative practices, the politics of policing, and the problems of law enforcement in a democratic society.

TCCN: CRIJ 2328

CRIJ 2329 Fundamentals of Criminal Law

A study of the nature of substantive criminal law. Included are philosophies and historical developments, major definitions and concepts, classification of crime, and the elements of crimes and their penalties. Texas statues will be utilized as illustrations.

TCCN: CRIJ 1310

CRIJ 3302 Philosophy of Law

An examination and evaluation of some basic practices and principles of Anglo-American law. This course will focus on such problems as : the nature and extent of legal liability, strict liability statutes, "Good Samaritan" laws, the law of ciminal attempts, the enforcement of community moral standards, the obligation to obey the law, the justification of punishment and capital punishment, civil disobedience, and affirmative action and reverse discrimination. We will examine prominent legal cases and their underlying principles, but the emphasis will be on the philosophical analysis and evaluation of the law in these areas. Reading will be drawn from both classical and contemporary sources. (Cross-listed with PHIL 3302).

CRIJ 3305 Research Methods in Social Sci

An introduction to the scientific method as applied to social science research. Topics include research methods, research designs, the analysis of data, and basic computer techniques. (Cross listed with PSCI 3301 and SOCI 3305).

CRIJ 3306 Law & Society

This course will examine the dynamics of how laws are created, by whom and for the benefit of which particular groups in society. The focus is on inequality in the application of laws to women and minorities.

CRIJ 3308 Victimology

An introduction to the field of victimology. Topics include society's perceptions of victims, theories of victimization, the nature of victimization, patterns of victimization, and recent societal responses to the problems of victims.

CRIJ 3309 Probation and Parole

This course involves a survey of post-conviction alternatives to incarceration. It will examine intermediate punishments, treatment programs, and post-conviction programs.

CRIJ 3310 Juvenile Delinquency&Justice

As survey of juvenile offenders and the juvenile justice system. Includes theories of delinquency, the history of the juvenile courts, and the operation of the juvenile justice system. Special attention will be paid to the role of the police, juvenile court practices, and their legal basis, community-based juvenile programs, and juvenile institutions.

CRIJ 3311 Institutional Corrections

An examination of both prisons and jails as "total institutions." The course will include the history of prisons, various philosophies of incarceration, organizational structure, institutional subcultures, and problems encountered in the classification and supervision of incarcerated offenders.

CRIJ 3320 Organized Crime

Examines organized criminal groups, such as the so-called "mafia," in the twentieth century. Applies historical, economic, political, and legal perspectives. Emphasizes labor rackets, gambling syndicates, and extortion methods. Covers in detail special government commissions and major legislative reforms.

CRIJ 3325 Drugs in Our Society

Provides students with a realistic perspective of the drug problem. Areas of concentration includes (1) history of drug abuse public policy; (2) nature of common drugs; and (3) legislative and enforcement issues including the legalization debate, organized crime, and political dimensions.

CRIJ 4140 Special Issues in Criminal Jus

An intensive examination of special topics of study in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, race/ethnicity and crime, crime and the media, trafficking in women and children, quantitative research methods, terrorism, current issues in criminal Justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor.

CRIJ 4190 Undergraduate Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4240 Special Issues in Criminal Jus

An intensive examination of special topics of study in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, race/ethnicity and crime, crime and the media, trafficking in women and children, quantitative research methods, terrorism, current issues in criminal Justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor.

CRIJ 4290 Undergraduate Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4305 Police Personnel Management

Personnel management from an interpersonal relations standpoint. Emphasis is upon establishing and maintaining effective communications, conflict and conflict resolution, and establishing a supportive climate for teamwork with and between law enforcement agencies of the criminal justice system.

CRIJ 4311 The Constitution and Civil Lib

The parameters of the federal Constitution and civil liberties; rights of citizens against state and federal governments; the nature of due process and the equal protection of the law; freedoms of expression, association and religion. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4311)

CRIJ 4312 Constitution and Crim Pro Law

The Constitution’s limits on government authority to gather evidence and investigate crime by examination of the Fourth Amendment’s limits on search, seizure and arrest; the Fifth Amendment’s privilege against self-incrimination; and the Sixth Amendment’s right to counsel. Prerequisite for CRIJ majors: Successful completion of 12 lower-level CRIJ required courses. Prerequisite for non-CRIJ majors: Twelve hours of social sciences outside of CRIJ. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4312)

CRIJ 4320 Women & Criminal Justice

The course deals with incidence studies and casual theories in female criminology as well as criminal justice processing of female offenders. Also examined are issues concerning female personnel working in police, court and correctional agencies. A female victimological approach is included.

CRIJ 4321 Senior Pro-Seminar

This course is an intensive seminar that allows students to critically examine issues relevant to the police, courts, and correctional systems in the U.S. It is a writing intensive course in which students will apply research skills and submit a literature review. Students also participate in review sessions related to core topical areas in criminal justice.

Prerequisites: Senior standing, and consent of Instructor.

CRIJ 4324 Media and Crime

Analyzes the images of crime, criminals, and the criminal justice system that are presented through major mass and entertainment media in the United States. Students will be able to examine how the media portrays violence, crime and criminals; influences crime policy; and, impacts public perceptions of crime and victimization. (Cross-listed with COMM 4311 and PSYC 4311)

CRIJ 4325 Statistics in Criminal Justice

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to basic concepts and techniques necessary for a preliminary and proficient understanding of criminal justice research. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing and interpreting research findings using a standard statistical software package that includes descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and bivariate analysis.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 3305, and Junior/Senior Standing.

CRIJ 4333 White Collar Crime

This course will focus on the study of contemporary forms of white collar crime and its explanations, theories, and practices along with its investigation, adjudication, and regulation. This course also explores the law of economic and political crimes associated with white collar crime. Students will examine reported cases, case studies, and other materials to investigate the topic of white collar crime - thus gain a foundation for an understanding of this fascinating subject.

CRIJ 4334 Administration of Justice

This course covers contemporary concepts, principles and theories of administration of justice in criminal justice agencies. This course is intended to introduce the student to the views of prominent writers on theories of management and relate them to the field of criminal justice administration. A central intent of this course is to enhance the student’s ability to understand the art and science of organization and administration in criminal justice.

CRIJ 4335 Death Penalty

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the death penalty both in the United States and abroad. Special attention is devoted to the history of the death penalty, Supreme Court decisions, and current statutory laws. Contemporary issues surrounding the death penalty including potential flaws in the administration of justice and alternative sanctions such as life without the possibility of parole are also covered.

CRIJ 4336 Special Needs Offen Corr Inst

This course will explore the variety of offenders with special needs in corrections and how correctional officials have responded to the changing prison population. Topics may include but are not limited to: juvenile inmates, female inmates, chronically and mentally ill inmates, substance addicted veterans, death row inmates under protective custody, incarcerated sex offenders, incarcerated veterans, death row inmates, immigrant inmates and inmate radicalization. Importantly, this course provides a deeper understanding of the concept and practice or corrections in 21st century America.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 1301.

CRIJ 4337 Ethics in Criminal Justice

This course explores the fundamental concept of fairness throughout the criminal justice system. It examines situations, dilemmas, and problems encountered by persons in all criminal justice agencies/organizations. More specifically, it examines ehtical issues in policing, the courts, and in correctional settings. Case scenarios are used to explain and analyze ethical dilemmas. Finally, the course looks at several ethical situations in ciminal justice more in-depth, such as interrogation tactics, prosecutorial misconduct and the death penalty.

CRIJ 4338 Crime&Crime Justice-Disaster

The sudden disruption of the normal flow of human activity in the form of disaster gives rise to both prosocial and antisocial behavior. This course focuses on the later and investigates the crime that occurs in the wake of disasters. This course explores the pre-disaster conditions that may give rise to crime, the extent and type of crime that occurs in the wake of disasters, the special challenges of measuring crime during and after a disaster, effective and ineffective responses to disaster crime, both domestically and internationally, and lastly, lingering questions for a criminology of disaster.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 1301.

CRIJ 4340 Special Issues in Criminal Jus

An intensive examination of special topics of study in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, race/ethnicity and crime, crime and the media, trafficking in women and children, quantitative research methods, terrorism, current issues in criminal Justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor.

CRIJ 4390 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4490 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4590 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4601 Criminal Justice Internship

This course is a supervised internship program for pre-service students only. The course requires the completion of 160 hours of internship service to an agency approved by the Internship Coordinator and the department chair. Internship hours must be completed during the semester in which the student is enrolled in the course. Students must attend class and complete course requirements such as assignments, exams, and a research project. The evaluation of student performance is on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite for CRIJ majors: Successful completion of the lower-level CRIJ courses required for the CRIJ major. Must be taken by CRIJ majors during senior year. Evaluation of performance in this course is on CR/NC basis. Restrictions: Students who are employed in the criminal justice field (or related field) are not eligible to take this course. Volunteer hours completed prior to enrolling in this course will not be counted as internship hours for this course.

CRIJ 4690 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

GEOG 1301 Physical Geography

An introductory examination of the earth's physical environment. An examination of the regional variation of different facets of the environment, including landforms, weather, and climate. The consequences of resource exploitation and environmental concerns are studied.

GEOG 1303 General World Geography

A study of the human geography of the world. An examination and comparison of major cultural geographic themes: population, migration, agriculture, religion, industrialization, urbanization, and political landscapes.

TCCN: GEOG 1303

GEOG 2301 Intro to Human Geography

This course is an introduction to the geographic distribution of humans, human activity, and cultures on the Earth. We will explore several topics as they relate to human geography, including population, folk/popular culture, religion, language, ethnicity, politics, agriculture, economic activity and development, and urbanization. Throughout the course, we will explore the impacts of globalization on culture. It is also hoped that students will gain a greater understanding an appreciation for geography in general, as well as a greater awareness for aspects for human geography that you experience in our globalized world.

TCCN: GEOG 1302

GEOG 3310 Human Impact on the Envrmnt

This class is an assessment of human impacts on the environment. This class will examne the impacts of human society on landscapes, the atmosphere, hydrology, and plants and animals. General themes include population and scarcity, the commons, risks and hazards, markets and commodities, and environmental ethics, among others while specific climate change, the social construction of nature, trees, bottled water, wolves, waste, and meat, to name a few.

GEOG 3314 Texas Geography

A geographical survey of the Lone Star State. This class will examine the environment, population, settlements, land uses, and cultural heritage of the State of Texas through the unifying concept of the region.

GEOG 3350 US Historical Geography

A survey of the changing geography of the United States including initial exploration, European perceptions of North America, diffusion and geographical expansion of the United States to the Pacific, geographical factors underlying the urbanization and industrialization of the nation, and recent population shifts.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history.

GEOG 3351 World History&Geography

A survey of world history focusing on the influence of geography on the course of history. The course includes the development of cartography, the spread of geographical knowledge, and the history of exploration.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science.

GEOG 3352 Latin American Historical Geog

A survey of the changing cultural geography of Latin America including pre-Colombian landscapes, early European settlement, migration, and the evolving economic integration into the world economy. Geographical and environmental factors underlying twentieth-century agricultural and urban problems of Latin America are considered.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or geography, or consent of instructor.

GEOG 3353 Political Geography

The study of the spatial or geographic expression of political phenomena. The primary themes include political regions, boundaries, territorial control, geopolitics, the functioning of the state at multiple scales (from local to national), and international trade and security pacts. Case studies emphasize the political geographies of North America and Latin America. (Cross-listed with PSCI 3353).

GEOG 3355 Nat, Cult, & Soci in Mex & Cen

This class is a regional geographic survey of Mexico and Central America's people, environments, and landscapes. It examines the intersection of culture and the envrionment by focusing on agriculture, settlement patterns, urbanization, indigenous peoples and ethnic diversity, land rights, migration, commodities, and the current effects globalization in Mexico south to Panama.

GEOG 3451 GIS for the Social Sciences

This class examines the application of Geographic Information Systems techniques in social science research. The course will provide social scientists with an important analytical skill set that is becoming increasingly important in many professions. GIS is a very powerful tool and this class will present examples of how Geographic Information Systems can be used in the social sciences to conduct sociospatial research

GEOG 4301 Introduction to Urban Planning

This course introduces students to the basic principles and concepts of urban planning. A primary focus is the practical skills/techniques associated with the major theories and models of planning. It provides a broad overview of all types of urban planning with emphasis on land use, design, transportation, and environmental and social planning. (Cross-listed with URBS 4301 and PSCI 4301)

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

GEOG 4340 Special Topics in Geography

This class examines a particular sub-field of geography or a particular geographical issue. May be repeated for credit if the topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Human Impact on the Environment, Biogeography, Waste and Society, Climate and Climate Change, Computer Cartography, Geostatistics, Geography of Latin American Indigenous Peoples, GPS and Geographic Research Methods, Geography of the US South, and Geography of Middle America.

GEOG 4395 Urban Historical Geography

The study of the continuing evolution of urban landscapes in Western civilization. An examination of urban form and function through time, from Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman cities to industrial and post-industrial cities and suburbs. May be taken for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with HIST 4395 and URBS 4395)

LEDR 2301 Foundations of Leadership

This course introduces students to leadership styles and the multiple definitions of leadership relating to various cultural, professional, civic and social roles. Includes a service learning component. This course is an introductory overview of leadership which must be taken prior to taking other required courses to earn the Certificate in International Leadership.

LEDR 4302 Theories of Leadership & Prac

This class is designed to emphasize the importance of leadership theories and their relevance in our daily lives. Practical application of theories will be a strong focus of the course and the application of theories to real-world situations. In addition, lectures, supplemental readings, and class handouts highlight research and theory for effective leadership across a variety of intercultural contexts. Students will also be required to put theories into practice through group projects and research. Included in this course is a focus on the intercultural principles associated with being a leader and the influences of service and civic engagement to impact positive social change.

Prerequisites: LEDR 2301.

LEDR 4303 International Leadership Cap

This course explores leadership in an international context and setting. Students participating in this faculty-led study abroad experience will explore international leadership content while immersing themselves in the culture of the site country. Upon return to the United States, students will have one semester to complete an independent project with regular consultation from the faculty member. This capstone will include an analysis of their experiences prior, during and after the trip abroad and will build upon their experiences in other courses from the leadership minor. Students who are unable to travel abroad should consult their advisor and department chair one year in advance to facilitate accommodations to this course.

Prerequisites: Department approval.

PSCI 2301 Intro to Political Leadership

An introduction to the political, moral, and cultural factors that have shaped political leadership throughout the ages. Case studies drawn from political and social history to illustrate what makes human leadership unique and investigate why leadership and political organization vary across human societies, both historically and cross-culturally. (Cross-listed with LEDR 2301)

PSCI 2304 Intro to Political Science

An introductory survey of concepts, theories, and principles of political science. The political dynamics and institutions of several leading nations of today; the competing philosophies of the twentieth century (democracy, communism and fascism). This course cannot be used to satisfy the state required government courses.

PSCI 2305 American National Government

A survey of national government in the United States with emphasis upon the Constitution, government structure, and processes. European background; federal, state, and interstate relations; rights and obligations of citizens; political parties; group organization; the legislative process; and the executive, judicial, and administrative functions in federal government. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

TCCN: GOVT 2305

PSCI 2306 American State Government

Analysis of state and local government in the United States, with particular emphasis upon the State of Texas. History of state governments; state constitutions; the role of the individual pertaining to the rights and liberties in participation in government; political parties, pressure groups, and the franchised. The state legislature, the governor and state administration, state court system, county municipal organization, and current problems of local government. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

TCCN: GOVT 2306

PSCI 2420 The American Way

This course will focus on the major events that helped to make the United States what it is today, including the Colonial Era and Independence, specifically the writing of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, as well as the majors events of the 19th and 20th centuries. The branches of government, including the checks and balances and separation of powers, will be emphasized as well as the civil rights and liberties of all citizens. An element of the course is faculty-led travel to important historical and governmental sites in Texas. Fulfills the Texas State requirement in history and U.S. government. Enrollment restricted to qualified international students enrolled in joint degree programs.

PSCI 3301 Research Methods in Social Sci

An introduction to the scientific method as applied to social science research. Topics include research methods, research designs, the analysis of data, and basic computer techniques. (Cross- listed with SOCI 3305)

PSCI 3302 Urban Political Theory

This course is designed as an introduction to foundational social theory with a specific orientation toward urban studies. We will explore the early identification of the urban phenomenon with the emergence of modernity, pertinent theoretical and practical responses to the industrial city, the city's role in capitalist accumulation and social conflict, the problem of sustaining urban vitality and community, and new functions of culture and representation in modern cities. (Cross-listed with URBS 3302)

PSCI 3305 Govt & Politics of Europe

The structures, function, and processes of selected European political systems.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 3308 Latin American Pol Systems

A comparative analysis of the major political systems of Latin America that emphasizes the role of political cultures, elites, and inter-systematic factors.

PSCI 3310 Studies in Comp Politics

This course will explore the methods of comparative political analysis. The course will emphasize political culture, structural functionalism, formal, legal, group, elite, class, and system approaches.

PSCI 3313 Class&Med Political Phil

A survey and analysis of political thought, theory, and political philosophy from Greek antiquity to the present.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 3314 Modern Political Philosophy

Fundamentals of poitical thought, theory, and philosophy since Machiavelli; major contemporary political theories and movements.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 3320 Congress and the Presidency

This course examines the functions and operations of these two branches of the federal government. How representative is the U. S. Congress? How does the Presidency govern? Moreover, the course explores the nature of the congressional-executive relations.

PSCI 3322 The Politics of Class & Gender

This class focuses on the political and economic power of women as a function of the dynamics of contemporary U.S. culture. Using various socioeconomic models, the interactive effects of gender, class, and ethnicity will be explored. Consideration will be given to such issues as women's workplace and educational opportunities, the feminization of poverty, women's health policy, and other contemporary concerns.

PSCI 3325 Grassroots & Community Emp

This course in applied, practical politics emphasizes how to affect the political process directly. The course evaluates grassroots organizations, citizen empowerment, community activism, social movements, political parties, interest groups, and elections in a democratic society. Moreover, we will study the critical elements of effective electoral and issue campaigns.

PSCI 3340 International Law & Org

A survey of the historical development and present role played by international law in the world community, and the formation and operation of international organizations. Organizations to be examined include the United Nations, regional development banks, alliance systems, cartels, common markets, and other international political organizations.

PSCI 3341 Great Books: Classical to Ren

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition before the Renaissance, from Greco-Roman period to Renaissance. Classics such as Plato's Republic, Plutarch's Lives, Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, Dante's Divine Comedy may be read. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. (Cross-listed with ENGL 3341, and PHIL 3341)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

PSCI 3342 Great Books: Renaissance-Pres

An intensive study of one or two philosophical classics or a series of readings selected from the classics of Western tradition since the Renaissance, from Cervantes to the present. Classics such as de Tocqueville's Democracy in America, Wollstonecrafts' A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Nietzsche's The Uses and Abuses of History, Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience" may be read. (Cross-listed with PHIL 3342, and ENGL 3342)

Prerequisites: Three hours of sophomore literature or consent of instructor.

PSCI 3345 Intro to Public Administration

Perceptions of bureaucracy; organizational theory and behavior; administrative leadership and decision making; personnel problems and public unions; agency clientele and public interest; questions of administrative ethics, morality, and accountability; and individual in-depth studies of selected public policies.

PSCI 3350 Intro to Analysis of Public

Systematic analysis of factors affecting policy-making and implementation at various stages. Theories of decision-making, organizational behavior of bureaucracies, and regulatory alternatives.

PSCI 3353 Political Geography

The study of the spatial or geographic expression of political phenomena. The primary themes include political regions, boundaries, territorial control, geopolitics, the functioning of the state at multiple scales (from local to national), and international trade and security pacts. Case studies emphasize the political geographies of North America and Latin America. (Cross listed with GEOG 3353).

PSCI 4301 Introduction to Urban Planning

This course introduces the student to the basic principles and concepts of urban planning. A primary focus is the practical skills/techniques associated with the major theories and models of planning. It provides a broad overview of all types of urban planning with emphasis on land use, design, transportation, and environmental and social planning. (Cross-listed with GEOG 4301 and URBS 4301)

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

PSCI 4307 The Interamerican System

This course analyzes the development of the modern Interamerican System, with emphasis on international and domestic factors that shape hemispheric pacts like the Organization of the American States (OAS) and sub-regional projects like NAFTA. The course also explores contemporary challenges to political and economic integration in the Americas.

PSCI 4309 Mexican Politics & Government

This course explores the roles of Mexican government institutions, state and local governments, political parties, the military, economic elites and social movements. The course analyzes the evolution of their relationships over time, as well as their influence on domestic and foreign choices. (Cross-listed with PSCI 5309)

PSCI 4311 The Constitution and Civil Lib

The parameters of the federal Constitution and civil liberties; rights of citizens against state and federal governments; the nature of due process and the equal protection of the law; freedoms of expression, association and religion. (Cross-listed with CRIJ 4311)

PSCI 4312 Constitution and Crim Pro Law

The Constitution’s limits on government authority to gather evidence and investigate crime by examination of the Fourth Amendment’s limits on search, seizure and arrest; the Fifth Amendment’s privilege against self-incrimination; and the Sixth Amendment’s right to counsel. (Cross-listed with CRIJ 4312)

PSCI 4313 Constitution and Govt Powers

The powers of government, state and federal, under the federal Constitution; relations between branches of the federal government; limitations on governmental authority by virtue of the distribution of power.

PSCI 4314 Issues in U.S. Government

Basic issues and cases of U.S. Government are analyzed in order to better understand the workings of our political system. The Constitution, political parties and interest groups, public opinion and the media, civil rights and the workings of the federal system and the main branches of government are also evaluated.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4315 Issues in State&Local Gov't

This course is a study, through readings and case studies, of the issues and problems particular to government at the state and local level.

PSCI 4320 The Political System of U.S

An intensive analysis of the United States of America's political system in terms of elitism and democratic behavior of elites and masses.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4321 Special Stud in Political Sci

An intensive examination of special topics of study in political science. May be repeated once when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4326 The Judicial Process

A study of the American judicial system with emphasis upon its structure, function, and process. Interchangeable with CRIJ 1306 with permission of CRIJ faculty advisor. (Cross-listed with PSCI 5326)

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4335 International Politics

This course will explore and analyze various topics in international politics. Emphasis will be given to major theories and their application to related areas, issues, and regions. May be repeated once when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4340 American Foreign Policy

A study of the sources of American foreign policy in domestic institutions and public opinion, and in the actions of foreign governments, as a means of elucidating the policy making process. (Cross-listed with HIST 3380).

PSCI 4345 Urban Politics

Forms and organization of city government. A study of urban political processes and major public problems confronting urban areas. (Cross-listed with URBS 4345).

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4350 Ethnic Politics

A study of ethnic interest groups and the varieties of American ethnic politics. Emphasis on ethnic groups in Texas. (Cross-listed with PSCI 5350)

Prerequisites: Six hours of political science.

PSCI 4351 Senior Seminar in PSCI

This course is the capstone for undergraduate studies in political science. It bridges major sub-fields of political science to identify linkages as well as divergences within the discipline. The course emphasizes contemporary developments in the study of politics by exploring current theoretical approaches, research methods, and emerging issues.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and PSCI 3301, 3310, 3313, 3320 and 4335.

PSCI 4380 Civic Engagement & Leadership

Civic Engagement and Leadership is an experiential learning course that seeks to make a difference in the civic life of communities and develops in students the combination of knowledge, skills, values and motivation to make that difference. Students have multiple options, they may 1) perform hands-on work in the community in service based learning course 2) students can volunteer to work in designated civic engagement and leadership approved programs on campus, 3) students can complete an intensive internship experience, which requires pre-approval from the political science program director. Regardless of what option students choose they must enroll into PSCI 4380.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.

PSCI 4390 Undergraduate Research in PSCI

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in political science. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and either the Director of Political Science or the department chair.

SOCI 1301 Intro to Sociology

A scientific approach to the study of the cultural and social basis for human behavior, including the impact of societal groups and organizations on personal identity, feelings and behavior. Topics for special focus include the individual impact of ethnicity, social class, gender, religion, family structure, peer groups, complex organizations, mass media and educational, political and economic systems.

TCCN: SOCI 1301

SOCI 1306 Cont Social Prob&Social Pol

A survey and analysis of the causes and consequences of major social problems in American Society, such as poverty, environmental pollution, domestic violence and substance abuse. An examination of the effectiveness of current social policies being used to address major American social problems.

TCCN: SOCI 1306

SOCI 3302 Social Welfare&Human Service

An introduction to the helping professions with emphasis on human service organizations, and models of social service delivery. Discourse on current controversial issues, social welfare policies and the code of professional ethics.

SOCI 3304 Sociological Theory

The study of how theories are formulated in social science. Overview of classical and contemporary sociological theories including functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, phenomenology and postmodern theory.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1301, and three hours of any Sociology course for a total of six credit hours in Sociology.

SOCI 3305 Research Methods in Social Sci

An introduction to the scientific method as applied to social science research. Topics include research methods, research designs, the analysis of data, and basic computer techniques. (Cross listed with CRIJ 3305 and PSCI 3301).

SOCI 3307 U.S.-Mexico Border Subcultures

Analysis of Spanish, Mexican, and European American cultural influences upon the development of contemporary U.S.-Mexico border subcultures. The implications of Mexican American and new Mexican immigrant subcultures for education and social service delivery.

SOCI 3308 Latin American Cultures

The study of the impact of Spanish and Portuguese colonization upon the indigenous cultures and political economy of Latin America. Analysis of the development of new syncratic Latino cultural forms reflecting Iberian, Native American and African heritage in contemporary Central and South America and the Caribbean. (Cross-listed with ANTH 3308)

SOCI 3310 Sociology of Education

This course will introduce the student to sociological perspectives on the institution of education in societies and the educational organizations which this institution generates. Several sociological-theoretical perspectives will be used to analyze this institution and its consequent organizations. The structure, functions, and processes of education will be reviewed. Different societies will be compared with respect to these. It is anticipated that the student will be able to use sociological theory, research methods, data, and concepts to analyze educational organizations to introduce appropriate interventions, and to evaluate the impact of such interventions. The course should be particularly helpful to individuals expecting to work with, and in, educational organizations. However, it should also be valuable to parents and citizens interested in the importance of education in society, community, and individually. (Formerly SOCI 2310)

SOCI 3316 Urban Sociology

The study of the culture, history, and growth patterns of cities, including current trends toward suburbanization and its environmental impact. Examination of the emergence of cities with global or regional orientations and the impact of the decline of manufacturing and emergence of information and technology on city growth. Consideration of housing, budget and other problems faced by cities. Special emphasis on the growth of twin cities along the U. S.-Mexico border. (Cross-listed with URBS 3316)

SOCI 3336 Criminology

The development of criminological thought; critical evaluation of theories of criminality, the study of criminal organization and socialization; and the extent, type, and sources of crime.

SOCI 4310 Social Inequality

Analysis of theory and research on social inequality, its causes and consequences. Special attention will be given to an examination of poverty in the South Texas region.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4311 Marriages&Families

Analysis of the family as an educational and social institution in light of historical relationships and present-day social an economic conditions, including a study of family cohesion, adaptability, satisfaction and conflict.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4316 Social Service Internship

The internship is designed to offer supervised on the job training experiences and career opportunities in various settings in health, education, and human service organizations. Students will apply sociological knowledge in a social service setting, attend class and individual conferences with the Internship Coordinator, produce time sheets, reports and a supervisor’s evaluation based on internship performance. Non-Sociology majors may take this course with permission of student’s advisor. Students receive a certificate upon successful completion of the Internship. Evaluation of performance in this course is on CR/NC basis.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4317 Race&Ethnic Relations

Critical analysis of the concepts of race and ethnicity and the changing basis for racial and ethnic identity in the multicultural United States. An examination of patterns of dominant-minority relations in the United States as compared to other world societies. An overview of the history and current social conditions of Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and European Americans.

Prerequisites: Junior standing

SOCI 4318 Globalization

This course focuses on developing sensitivity to cultural differences, becoming knowledgeable of global issues, and developing the ability to play significant roles in formulating and recommending solutions to contemporary national, transnational and global problems and concerns.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4320 Women in Criminal Just Syst

Analysis of incidence studies and examination of theories about women's criminality. The study of mass media stereotypes of female offenders and victims; female victimology; issues concerning women who work in police, court, and correctional facilities and criminal justice system processing of women offenders. Interchangeable with CRIJ 4320.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4325 Sociology of Gender Roles

An analysis of the role of biology, cultural socialization, and social institutions in the formulation and maintenance of constructs of masculine and feminine gender in world societies. The study of the social impact of changes in women's and men's roles in postindustrial societies upon the family, the workplace and other major social institutions. The examination of the impact of gender constructs upon familial relationships, spirituality and policy orientations. An evaluation of the positive and negative impact of the women's movement and men's movement upon the status of women and men of different race/ethnicity and social class. (Cross-listed with WGST 4325)

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4330 Sociology of Sexualities

This course examines theory and research of human sexualities. It analyses the social, legal and medical changes connected to sexualities and their implications for individual and the family.

SOCI 4370 Medical Sociology

The role of social and cultural factors in the distribution and causes of disease; doctor-patient relationships; beliefs about health, illness, treatment and recovery; access to health institutions and the organization of health care systems.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4375 Special Studies in Sociology

An intensive examination of special topics of study in sociology. May be repeated for credit if the topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the Study of Society, Collective Behavior and Social Movements, Comparative Organizations, Sexualities, Environmental Justice, Sociology of Law, Sociology of Religion, Contemporary U.S. Culture, Institutional Care of the Aged, Immigration issues and Demography.

Prerequisites: SOCI 1301 or six hours of Sociology.

SOCI 4380 Senior Proseminar

Designed to consolidate the academic foundations of Sociology with the transition to becoming a professional sociologist. Highlights are: review of the major sociological theories and methods of conducting research, core concepts, communication skills, career development, the code of ethics, job opportunities, and effective assertiveness. This capstone experience, required of all sociology majors, includes weekly seminar meetings with faculty. Prospective graduate students from non-Sociology majors are required to take this course as stem work.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in sociology.

SOCI 4385 Child Maltreatment

This course examines theory and research on child abuse and neglect with a focus on interventions for offenders and victims.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOCI 4390 Domestic Violence

Analysis of theory and research on the prevalence of domestic violence and its patterns and dynamics. An examination of preventative education and interventions for offenders and victims. Special focus will be placed upon multicultural populations.

SOCI 4616 Social Service Internship

The internship is designed to offer supervised on the job training experiences and career opportunities in various settings in health, education, and human service organizations. Students will apply sociological knowledge in a social service setting, attend class and individual conferences with Internship Coordinator, produce time sheets, reports and a supervisor's evaluation based on internship performance. Non-Sociology majors may take this course with permission of students' advisor. Students receive a certificate upon successful completion of the Internship. Evaluation of performance in this course is on CR/NC basis.

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

SOST 4391 Topics in Social Studies

A general survey of social studies that emphasizes content relevant to public school teachers. The primary subject matter of this interdisciplinary course is economics, political science, history, geography, culture and society. This course may not be taken as an elective.

URBS 2301 Introduction to Urban Studies

A multidisciplinary introduction to the study of the contemporary city and urban issues, domestic and international. An overview of different disciplines' approaches to the study of the city and urban issues, including urban history, geography, politics/public administration, sociology, planning, and design and architecture.

URBS 3301 Urban Anthropology

A study of how humans adapt culturally and biologically to increasingly dense settlement patterns. Examines the process by which complex societies emerge, from ancient times to the present: the strategies humans use to cope with demands posed by urban environments; and a cross-cultural study of format and informal cultural use of urban space. (Cross-listed with ANTH 3301)

URBS 3302 Urban Political Theory

This course is designed as an introduction to foundational social theory with a specific orientation toward urban studies. We will explore the early identification of the urban phenomenon with the emergence of modernity, pertinent theoretical and practical responses to the industrial city, the city's role in capitalist accumulation and social conflict, the problem of sustaining urban vitality and community, and new functions of culture and representation in modern cities. (Cross-listed with PSCI 3302)

URBS 4301 Introduction to Urban Planning

This course introduces students to the basic principles and concepts of urban planning. A primary focus is the practical skills/techniques associated with the major theories and models of planning. It provides a broad overview of all types of urban planning with emphasis on land use, design, transportation, and environmental and social planning. (Cross-listed with GEOG 4301 and PSCI 4301).

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or consent of instructor.

URBS 4302 Topics in Latin American Urban

A special topics seminar that considers one or more aspects of the Latin American urban landscape, including architecture, housing, historic preservation and gentrification, urban economic policy and planning, industrialization, transportation, urban primacy and urban form and function (morphology). May be repeated once when topic changes. May be taken for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with GEOG 4302)

Prerequisites: Six hours of GEOG or URBS.

URBS 4305 Urban Studies Internship

Supervised internship program. The student is placed in a department of a city or county government, or similar entity, that relates to such urban issues as transportation, physical infrastructure, public lands, and social services. The student is evaluated in part on the quality of the required written report upon completion of the internship, and in part on the hosting agency's/department's written evaluation of the student's work performance.

Prerequisites: Upper division standing, and a completed and approved Internship Agreement.

URBS 4360 Special Topics:Administration

This course is designed to develop students’ hands-on knowledge and deeper understanding towards urban administrative issues. A specific topic will be selected for the course and the students will focus on the history, politics, and implementation of the issue. The topics can range from national issues such as immigration to local issues such as transportation projects in Laredo.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing.

URBS 4370 Special Topics:Planning

This course is designed to develop students’ hands-on knowledge and deeper understanding towards urban planning issues. A specific topic will be selected for the course and the students will focus on the history, politics, and implementation of the issue. The topics can range from national issues such as urban sprawl to local issues such as transportation problems in Laredo.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing.

URBS 4395 Urban Historical Georaphy

The study of the continuing evolution of urban landscapes in Western civilization. An examination of urban form and function through time, from Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman cities to industrial and post-industrial cities and suburbs. May be taken for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with GEOG 4395 and HIST 4395)

WGST 2301 Intro Women's & Gender Studies

A multidisciplinary introduction to the study of the gender images of masculinity and femininity. Topics will be framed in a historical perspective and may include how gender affects family dynamics, school and organizational settings, gender roles, sexual identity, verbal communication, the media, and power and violence.

WGST 2302 Intro to LGBTQ Studies

This interdisciplinary course introduces concepts and theories within LGBTQ Studies. Topics include issues related to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities. The central focus is to examine, challenge, and destabilize normative conceptualizations and representations of gender and sexuality. This class emphasizes different aspects of LGBTQ studies including history, queer theory, popular culture, media, and literature. Course work centers on complicating notions of queer identity through intersections of race, class, gender, and globalization.

WGST 3301 Topics in Women's Studies

An in-depth study of an issue of significance in the field of Women's Studies. This course may deal with issues including history, literature, art, social or behavioral sciences, communication, business, or education. May be repeated once when the topic changes.

WGST 3302 Topics in Gender Studies

An in-depth study of an issue of significance in the field of Gender Studies. This course may deal with issues including history, literature, art, social or behavioral science, communication, business, or education. May be repeated once when the topic changes.

Prerequisites: WGST 3300 or consent of instructor.

WGST 3310 Introduction to Queer Studies

A multidisciplinary introduction to the field of queer studies. The course will introduce students to aspects of queer theory and lesbian and gay studies in the humanities, including but not limited to literature, art, popular culture, and history. Topics will be framed in a historical perspective and will cover various aspects of sexuality, sexual identity, and how these concepts function in the present day.

Prerequisites: WGST 3300 or premission of instructor.

WGST 4325 Sociology of Gender Roles

An analysis of the role of biology, cultural socialization, and social institutions in the formulation and maintenance of constructs of masculine and feminine gender in world societies. The study of the social impact of changes in women's and men's roles in postindustrial societies upon the family, the workplace and other major social institutions. The examination of the impact of gender constructs upon familial relationships, spirituality and policy orientations. An evaluation of the positive and negative impact of the women's movement and men's movement upon the status of women and men of different race/ethnicity and social class. May be taken for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with SOCI 4325).

Prerequisites: Junior standing.

WGST 4399 Senior Sem: Women&Gender Stud

Students will examine theoretical readings in Women's Studies and Gender Studies and will develop interdisciplinary, independent projects.

Prerequisites: WGST 2301 or 2302, and nine hours of Women's and Gender Studies electives.