History (HIST)

HIST 1301 The US to 1877

This course covers discovery; European contributions and forces; Spanish and Portuguese conquests in the Americas; English, French, and Dutch in America. The English Colonies in America; accomplishments of nationalistic groups; War of Independence; establishment of the new nation, problems of the formative period, western development, and frontier influence; cultural and constitutional growth; internal dissension and international problems; and Reconstruction. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

TCCN: HIST 1301

HIST 1302 The US Since 1877

Covers the growth of national ideas; movement for individual freedom; party government and public interests; industrial development; labor problems and agrarian unrest; changing international policies; war and peace; problems of agriculture, business, and government; cultural progress and attempts at social cooperation; and current world problems and trends. It is recommended that HIST 1301 be taken before 1302. See Texas Success Initiative in the section entitled UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.

TCCN: HIST 1302

HIST 2150 Historical Biography

This course provides an account of a prominent figure's life with the intent of examining the person's historical significance.

HIST 2151 History and Film

This course provides an examination of the interaction between historical research and various forms of film media including feature films abd documentaries.

HIST 2250 Historical Biography

This course provides an account of a prominent figure's life with the intent of examining the person's historical significance.

HIST 2251 History and Film

This course provides an examination of the interaction between historical research and various forms of film media including feature films abd documentaries.

HIST 2321 Eastern Civilization

This course provides a study a study of eastern civilizations, including those of Africa, Asia and regions of the Middle East.

TCCN: HIST 2321

HIST 2322 Western Civilization

This course provides a study of western civilization including the ancient societies of Greece and Rome, feudal Europe and the modern European nation states.

TCCN: HIST 2322

HIST 2350 Historical Biography

This course provides an account of a prominent figure's life with the intent of examining the person's historical significance.

HIST 2351 History and Film

This course provides an examination of the interaction between historical research and various forms of film media including feature films abd documentaries.

HIST 2420 The American Way

This course will focus on the major events that helped to make the United States what it is today, including the Colonial Era and Independence, specifically the writing of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, as well as the majors events of the 19th and 20th centuries. The branches of government, including the checks and balances and separation of powers, will be emphasized as well as the civil rights and liberties of all citizens. An element of the course is faculty-led travel to important historical and governmental sites in Texas. Fulfills the Texas State requirement in history and U.S. government. Enrollment restricted to qualified international students enrolled in joint degree programs.

HIST 3302 History of Texas

Covers the history of Texas from the early explorations to modern times. Course stresses the development of comprehension, analytic, and evaluative skills with regard to important issues, including Spanish colonial influences on Texas, the Texas Revolutionary period, the rise of the cattle kingdom, and recent social, economic and political developments. This course may not be substituted for any course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or permission of instructor.

HIST 3303 Historical Methods-WIN

This required course is designed to give history majors and minors a grounding in the methodologies that professional historians utilize in their scholarship. Designed to be taken at the beginning of work on the major, the class will consider a number of important topics in the research and writing of history. Emphasis will be given to issues such as how historians find and examine evidence, how they pose questions, and how they reach answers to those questions. This course may not be substituted for any other course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301/1302.

HIST 3310 Military History of the US

This course covers US military history from early colonial warfare in the eighteenth century to the global war on terrorism in the twenty-first century. It includes the role military officers have played in the development ofthe United States.

Prerequisites: Junior Standing.

HIST 3320 The World Since 1914

Forces, movements and events which have produced present world conditions.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or permission of instructor.

HIST 3330 Colonial Latin America

Transformation of Latin America under Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule (1492-1826). Course emphasizes the convergence of indigenous, European, and African peoples that laid the foundations for modern Latin American society. Topics include conquest and settlement, the impact of slavery, and cultural-intellectual changes that led to independence.

HIST 3331 Modern Latin America

Social and political challenges faced by Latin American nations from independence to present. Emphasis on foreign relations, revolutionary insurgency, and Latin America’s role in the modern world economy.

HIST 3332 Mexico

Political, economic, and cultural evolution of Mexican society from pre-conquest to present. Emphasis on Mexico’s connections to the wider world through topics such as global trade, nationalism, neocolonialism, and liberalism.

HIST 3333 Central America & Caribbean

The Caribbean Basin’s impact on early modern and modern globalization. Course takes a cultural as well as economic approach to topics such as slavery, European imperial rivalries, plantation economies, piracy, monoculture, and U.S. interventionism. Includes comparative perspective of the Hispanic, English, and French Atlantic Worlds.

HIST 3340 World Cultural History

This course examines the historical development, purpose, and influence of cultural activities, beliefs, and expressions found in a specific region or society of the world.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3341 U.S. Cultural History

This course examines the historical development, purpose, and influence of cultural activities, beliefs, and expressions found in the US society and its Religions.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302

HIST 3370 U.S. Women's History

This course focuses on the diversity of women's experiences in North America from colonial to modern times. The social, economic, political, and intellectual realms of women's worlds, public and private, will be studied.

HIST 3371 History of US Workers

This course describes and analyzes the history of US workers from the colonial period to the present. Topics include economic development, migration and immigration, race and ethnicity, slave and free labor, and the activities and fortunes of the American labor union movement in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3375 U.S. Southern History

This course focuses on the diversity of women's experiences in North America from colonial to modern times. The social, economic, political, and intellectual realms of women's worlds, public and private, will be studied.

HIST 3379 World Intellectual History

The impact of major ideas on the development of nations and movements throughout history.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302.

HIST 3380 Intellectual History of the US

The impact of major ideas on the development of the nation. Topics may include Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, rise of democracy, the Women's Rights Movement, Social Darwinism, industrialism, populism, progressivism, pragmatism, socialism, the Civil Rights Movement, American art and thought, and those aspects of American thought that continue to agitate contemporary society.

HIST 3381 Sport and US History

This course frames the development of nineteenth and twentieth century American society and culture in the context of sport. Topics include the socio-economic origins of such sports as baseball, boxing, and football, labor demands and the influence of money in US Sport, the conflicts over racial prejudice, exclusion, and integration, and he issues of gender roles and athletics.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3385 Mexican American History

This course is an examination of Mexican American history from the Spanish colonial period to the present. Topics include, the history of the Spanish borderlands, US annexation of the borderlands, nineteenth century labor and political systems, migration and immigration, and twentieth century Mexican American political activism. Prerequisite HIST 1301 and 1302.

HIST 3386 World Immigration History

This course investigates the reasons why people from specific reasons or societies around the world migrate and the motivations and experiences of specific groups of immigrants. Topics include trade, colonialism, economic and religious factors, and issues of gender, race, and legal statuses.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 3387 U.S. Immigration History

This course investigates the reason why people migrate to and within the US and the motivations and experiences of these immigrants. Topics include economic, social, and cultural factors, and issues of gender, race, and legal status.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and 1302.

HIST 3391 Islamic Civil 600-1400 CE

This course will survey the diverse history of Islamic societies from the 7th to the 16th century. Topics include: the pre-Islamic Middle East; Arabian society; Muhammad and the rise of the new religion; the expansion of Islam in Asia, Africa and Europe; the fundamental belief system of Islam; the Caliphate of Baghdad; the development of various schools of Islamic theology; the coming of the Turks; revolutionary Shi’ism; the Muslim experience in India, Africa and Central Asia; decline of Islamic power; and the crusades. While much of the focus will be on trends affecting the Islamic World as a whole, attention will also be given to selected regional issues. Students will be introduced to several primary source materials in translation such as selections from the Qur’an, philosophical works and travelers’ accounts.

HIST 3392 Contemporary Islamic World

This course explores some of the major themes that have led to the rise of the contemporary Islamic world. Themes that will be discussed include the diversity of interpretations within Islam such as Wahabism and mysticism, the legacy of the Ottoman Empire, gender relations in Islam, Islamic art and architecture, as well as the construction of nation states throughout the Islamic world. There will be a heavy emphasis on primary sources.

HIST 3393 History of Africa to 1880

This course is a survey of the continent’s history from earliest pre-colonial times to the eve of European colonial conquest, focusing on diversity and change in African societies. Themes include the development of pre-colonial technology and trade, state formation and Africa’s incorporation in the growing world economy.

HIST 3394 History of Africa Since 1880

This course is a survey course of major events and processed that occurred on the continent of Africa after 1800. Focusing on select cases and examples that illustrate larger trends and issues, this course concentrates on the expansion of African trade and states, European colonization, African response to colonial rule, African independence movements, and recent challenges and events in African nations (including underdevelopment, poverty and genocide).

HIST 3395 Contemporary South Asia

Contemporary South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, Nepal, and the Maldive Islands) contains a diversity of languages, cultures, religions and histories. It is also one of the most densely populated regions of the world. Using a thematic approach to study modern South Asia, this course places this region into historical, political, and socio-economic contexts across the dividing line of empires and nation-states.

HIST 3396 Borders & Identities in India

This course explores the shaping of nationalist movements and ideologies throughout the Indian subcontinent. It describes how both the colonial past and anti-colonial struggles impacted the processes of nation-building and identity formation, as well as present-day social and economic structures Themes that will be explored include education, gender, religion, culture, identity, nationalism, immigration, and popular culture.

HIST 4310 Historical Perspectives

This is the required capstone course for graduating history majors and minors to bring together many of the ideas and skills which they have learned during their coursework in history. The class will focus on an overview of historiography, the scholarship of historical writing. The course will emphasize the broader themes of world history and their impact on different eras and groups of people. Professional applied skills of historians such as research, presentation, and writing in multiple formats will be part of the course. May not be substituted for any other course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: HIST 3303 and Senior standing.

HIST 4316 Colonial America: Dis-1763

An examination of the political, social, economic, ideological, religious, and institutional development of America from the age of discovery and early settlements to the end of the French and Indian War. The course will emphasize the regional geography, folkways, and culture of the Chesapeake colonies, Puritan New England, the Lower South, and the Mid-Atlantic societies.

HIST 4317 Am Rev/Early Nat Era 1763-1815

A study of the international and colonial developments leading to the American Revolution and the winning of independence from Great Britain. Also includes: U. S. society's beginnings under the Articles of Confederation; the making of the Constitution of 1787, the forging of American institutions and culture under the first presidents, forces leading up to American involvement in the War of 1812, and the impact of the War on American civilization.

HIST 4318 Age of Jackson to Civil War

An examination of the major themes in U. S. history from 1815-1865, including the Market Revolution, the expansion of Jacksonian Democracy, the rise of the Old South, antebellum reform movements, westward expansion, and the rising tensions leading to the Civil War. This course will also include a detailed study of the Civil War itself, with consideration for its military, political, social, economic, and cultural impact of the United States.

HIST 4320 The Middle Ages

Europe from the downfall of Rome to the 14th century. The study of development of feudal society; impact of Islamic and Byzantine worlds; rise of the Papacy and the Crusades; economic life, technology, and invention; intellectual revival of the 12th century; crises of the 13th century; and developments of the later Middle Ages. May be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or permission of instructor.

HIST 4338 Pre-Modern Europe

Europe’s transition from Greco-Roman Antiquity to the High Middle Ages. Emphasis on the development of pre-modern social and political order, including Athenian democracy, Romanization, feudalism, and manorialism. Special topics include the rise of Christian orthodoxy, Islamic expansion in Southern Europe (especially Iberia), and medieval chivalry.

HIST 4339 Renaissance & Reform Europe

The history of two important cultural movements that marked the beginning of Europe’s transition into the modern era. Course places special emphasis on the interplay between religion, politics, economics, and artistic production.

HIST 4340 Early Modern Europe: 1600-1789

A history of the political, social, economic and intellectual character of 17th and 18th century Europe. May be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science.

HIST 4341 19th Century Europe

An examination of the political, social and cultural development of Europe from 1814 to 1914. May be taken for graduate credit. (Formerly HIST 3342)

Prerequisites: Six hours of history or political science.

HIST 4342 Modern Europe: 1914-1990

An examination of the political, social and cultural development of Europe in the 20th Century.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4350 North American Borderlands

This course examines and compares the US-Spanish/Mexican, US-Canadians, US-Native American borderlands from the colonial period to the present. The course focuses on border regions and frontiers as centers of society, politics, and culture.

Prerequisites: HIST 1301 and HIST 1302.

HIST 4364 US Southern History

Study of the major themes in the history of the southern U.S., including slavery, the rise of sectionalism, secession and Civil War, the development of Jim Crow laws and customs, the Lost Cause, and the Civil Rights Movement. This course will examine the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the South and its impact on the nation as a whole. May be taken for graduate credit.

Prerequisites: Six semester credit hours of history.

HIST 4366 Building Modern Am, 1865-1914

The United States from Reconstruction to the Progressive Era, including industrialization, immigration, urbanization, the rise of Jim Crow, Populism, labor, and social and political reform. Themes include the dramatic changes in U. S. political, racial, gender, economic, and cultural spheres and their impact on the beginnings of "the American century".

Prerequisites: Six semester credit hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4367 U.S. Rise to Wrld Pwr:1914-45

The United States during World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression, and World War II.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4368 United States Since 1945

The Cold War; social and cultural changes; the Vietnam era; and the Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and /or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4380 Women in the Developing World

This course examines women in the developing world during the pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial periods. More specifically, it explores the social changes that have taken place in Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. Among the topics addressed will be changing gender norms, ethnicity and identity, religion, polygyny, sati, motherhood, education, nationalism, political activism, and the current AIDS epidemic. In each case, the emphasis will not be on victimization or cultural decline but rather, the resilience and adaptability of women as “historical actors” in the developing world.

HIST 4390 Seminar in US History

Lectures, directed readings, seminar reports, and supervised research in a specified field of history. May be repeated once when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4391 Seminar in World History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of specific nations or regions of the world from an historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Six hours of history and/or political science or permission of instructor.

HIST 4392 Seminar in European History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of specific nations or regions of Europe from a historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

HIST 4393 Sem. in Latin American History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of specific nations or regions of Latin America from a historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

HIST 4394 Seminar in Eastern History

A study of the political, social, and cultural development of Eastern civilizations from a historical perspective. May be repeated when topic changes.

HIST 4395 Urban Historical Geography

The study of the continuing evolution of urban landscapes in Western civilization. An examination of urban form and function through time from Mesopotamian and Greco-Roman cities to industrial and post-industrial cities and suburbs. May be taken for graduate credit. (Cross-listed with GEOG 4395 and URBS 4395).

HIST 5170 Directed Research in History

Opportunity for graduate students to undertake independent study or research in history. Prior consent of faculty member(s) with whom students wish to work. Subject may vary from semester or semester. May be repeated for a total of 6 SCH. Graded CR/NC.

HIST 5301 Seminar in US History

This course is a special topics seminar designed to explore various issues in U.S. history. May be repeated whenever topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

HIST 5302 The West In American History

A look at the Trans-Mississippi West as fact and symbol from prehistoric times to the twentieth century: exploration, fur trade, mining frontier, transportation, cattle kingdoms, and the farming problems, as well as the environmental movement.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

HIST 5303 The Teaching of American Hist

This course imparts to students nontraditional content, including Southwestern regional history, as well as non-book sources of history, including memories of historical participants. In addition, the course will cover techniques in integrating into the curriculum the personal experiences of people, including interviewing techniques, archiving, and technological resources associated with interviewing (such as use of multimedia technology). It will also acquaint the student with developing technological resources in the teaching of American History, such as websites, software, videos.

HIST 5305 Civil War & Reconstruction

Examines the events leading to the Civil War, military operations, the aftermath of the war, and the importance of the Reconstruction Era.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

HIST 5310 Seminar in World History

This course will investigate a topic of world history taken anywhere from the earliest times to the twentieth century. May be repeated whenever topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate or BAMA standing.

HIST 5313 Sem in 18th Century US History

The course considers many of the developments in the US social, cultural, political, and economic life during the eighteenth century. Emphasis will be placed on historiographical issues and primary research. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in History.

HIST 5314 Sem in 19th Century US History

The course considers many of the developments in U.S. social, cultural, political. and economic life during the nineteenth century. Emphasis will be placed on historiographical issues and primary research. May repeat whenever topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in history.

HIST 5315 Sem in 20th Century US Hist

The course considers many of the developments in U. S. social, cultural, political, and economic life during the twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on historiographical issues and primary research. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in history.

HIST 5320 Seminar in Latin American Hist

A seminar in Latin American history with emphasis on the development of a research project or projects. May be repeated whenever topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

HIST 5324 Seminar in US Women's Hist

The course examines the lives of U. S. women and the major historiographical debates in women's history scholarship. Course materials will emphasize the diversity of women's experiences and will culminate in primary source research.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in history.

HIST 5325 Seminar in Mexican History

A seminar focusing on social, economic, political, and religious aspects of Mexico. Topics may cover periods from Indian Mexico to recent developments. May be repeated whenever topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

HIST 5330 Seminar in European History

The course focuses on selected periods and issues of European History. May be repeated whenever the topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate or BAMA standing.

HIST 5340 Sem Women in the Develop World

This course examines women in the developing world during the pre-colonial, colonial and postcolonial periods. More specifically, it explores the social changes that have taken place in Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. Among the topics addressed will be changing gender norms, ethnicity and identity, religion, polygyny, sati, motherhood, education, nationalism, political activism and the current AIDS epidemic. In each case, the emphasis will not be on victimization or cultural decline but rather, the resilience and adaptability of women as “historical actors” in the developing world.

HIST 5345 Sem in US Foreign Relations

This seminar will concentrate on major questions concerning the origins of modern U.S. diplomatic practices and the course of foreign relations including U.S. imperialism; the rise to world power; participation in the world wars; and the Cold War. The seminar will combine discussions of shared readings and individual student research projects.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in history.

HIST 5355 Sem in the History of Religion

The course focuses on selected periods and issues in religious history. The emphasis is on historiographical issues. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in history.

HIST 5360 Seminar in Border History

This course examines the historical and contemporary movements of peoples across borders, both forced and free-willed, and the complex issues of identity and belonging to which these processes give rise. Of particular focus are the creative possibilities that flow from the lived experiences of movement and being moved across borders. May be repeated when topic changes.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in history.

HIST 5370 Directed Research in History

Opportunity for graduate students to undertake independent study or research in history. Prior consent of faculty member(s) with whom students wish to work. Subject may vary from semester or semester. May be repeated for a total of 6 SCH. Graded CR/NC.

HIST 5380 Historiography

This seminar is concerned with the study of history as an intellectual discipline and focuses on many of the philosophical questions with which historians grapple The course also considers the often difficult relationship between academic and popular history and how that struggle influences our discipline. Readings and a research project will familiarize students with the contributions of major historians and schools of historical thought from ancient times to the present. May not be substituted for any other course without written permission from the department chair.

Prerequisites: Graduate or senior standing

HIST 5385 Sem in Teaching College Hist

The course covers the pedagogy and practice of delivering college-level history courses, with an emphasis on introductory survey courses. This class is mandatory for all students receiving the Certificate in Teaching History.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in History.

HIST 5398 Thesis I

This course is designed to be the first step towards the successful completion of the History thesis. Students will receive a passing grade for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis proposal to their graduate committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit

HIST 5399 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the History thesis. Students will receive a passing grade when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their graduate committee. If grade of IP received, student must enroll again for credit.