Criminal Justice (CRIJ)

CRIJ 1301 Intro to Criminal Justice

An overview of the criminal justice system, with a focus on decision points and administrative practices in police, criminal court, and correctional bureaucracies. The historical evolution of criminal justice agencies is covered along with basic criminal procedures.

TCCN: CRIJ 1301

CRIJ 1306 Courts&Criminal Procedure

Survey of the U. S. judicial system with emphases on formal judicial procedures and institutional structures. Also, quasi-judicial and extra-judicial features are covered as well as principles of evidence that pertain to the criminal justice process including the nature and types of criminal evidence and admissibility of evidence in court. Interchangeable with PSCI 4326.

TCCN: CRIJ 1306

CRIJ 2313 Correctional Systems&Practice

An analysis and evaluation of contemporary correctional practices. Covers the history of penology, sentencing variations, and community and institutional corrections.

TCCN: CRIJ 2313

CRIJ 2328 Police Systems&Practices

A study of the history and social settings of the police, the police role and discretion, police administrative practices, the politics of policing, and the problems of law enforcement in a democratic society.

TCCN: CRIJ 2328

CRIJ 2329 Fundamentals of Criminal Law

A study of the nature of substantive criminal law. Included are philosophies and historical developments, major definitions and concepts, classification of crime, and the elements of crimes and their penalties. Texas statues will be utilized as illustrations.

TCCN: CRIJ 1310

CRIJ 3302 Philosophy of Law

An examination and evaluation of some basic practices and principles of Anglo-American law. This course will focus on such problems as : the nature and extent of legal liability, strict liability statutes, "Good Samaritan" laws, the law of ciminal attempts, the enforcement of community moral standards, the obligation to obey the law, the justification of punishment and capital punishment, civil disobedience, and affirmative action and reverse discrimination. We will examine prominent legal cases and their underlying principles, but the emphasis will be on the philosophical analysis and evaluation of the law in these areas. Reading will be drawn from both classical and contemporary sources. (Cross-listed with PHIL 3302).

CRIJ 3305 Research Methods in Social Sci

An introduction to the scientific method as applied to social science research. Topics include research methods, research designs, the analysis of data, and basic computer techniques. (Cross listed with PSCI 3301 and SOCI 3305).

CRIJ 3306 Law & Society

This course will examine the dynamics of how laws are created, by whom and for the benefit of which particular groups in society. The focus is on inequality in the application of laws to women and minorities.

CRIJ 3308 Victimology

An introduction to the field of victimology. Topics include society's perceptions of victims, theories of victimization, the nature of victimization, patterns of victimization, and recent societal responses to the problems of victims.

CRIJ 3309 Probation and Parole

This course involves a survey of post-conviction alternatives to incarceration. It will examine intermediate punishments, treatment programs, and post-conviction programs.

CRIJ 3310 Juvenile Delinquency&Justice

As survey of juvenile offenders and the juvenile justice system. Includes theories of delinquency, the history of the juvenile courts, and the operation of the juvenile justice system. Special attention will be paid to the role of the police, juvenile court practices, and their legal basis, community-based juvenile programs, and juvenile institutions.

CRIJ 3311 Institutional Corrections

An examination of both prisons and jails as "total institutions." The course will include the history of prisons, various philosophies of incarceration, organizational structure, institutional subcultures, and problems encountered in the classification and supervision of incarcerated offenders.

CRIJ 3320 Organized Crime

Examines organized criminal groups, such as the so-called "mafia," in the twentieth century. Applies historical, economic, political, and legal perspectives. Emphasizes labor rackets, gambling syndicates, and extortion methods. Covers in detail special government commissions and major legislative reforms.

CRIJ 3325 Drugs in Our Society

Provides students with a realistic perspective of the drug problem. Areas of concentration includes (1) history of drug abuse public policy; (2) nature of common drugs; and (3) legislative and enforcement issues including the legalization debate, organized crime, and political dimensions.

CRIJ 4140 Special Issues in Criminal Jus

An intensive examination of special topics of study in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, race/ethnicity and crime, crime and the media, trafficking in women and children, quantitative research methods, terrorism, current issues in criminal Justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor.

CRIJ 4190 Undergraduate Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4240 Special Issues in Criminal Jus

An intensive examination of special topics of study in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, race/ethnicity and crime, crime and the media, trafficking in women and children, quantitative research methods, terrorism, current issues in criminal Justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor.

CRIJ 4290 Undergraduate Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4305 Police Personnel Management

Personnel management from an interpersonal relations standpoint. Emphasis is upon establishing and maintaining effective communications, conflict and conflict resolution, and establishing a supportive climate for teamwork with and between law enforcement agencies of the criminal justice system.

CRIJ 4311 The Constitution and Civil Lib

The parameters of the federal Constitution and civil liberties; rights of citizens against state and federal governments; the nature of due process and the equal protection of the law; freedoms of expression, association and religion. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4311)

CRIJ 4312 Constitution and Crim Pro Law

The Constitution’s limits on government authority to gather evidence and investigate crime by examination of the Fourth Amendment’s limits on search, seizure and arrest; the Fifth Amendment’s privilege against self-incrimination; and the Sixth Amendment’s right to counsel. Prerequisite for CRIJ majors: Successful completion of 12 lower-level CRIJ required courses. Prerequisite for non-CRIJ majors: Twelve hours of social sciences outside of CRIJ. (Cross-listed with PSCI 4312)

CRIJ 4320 Women & Criminal Justice

The course deals with incidence studies and casual theories in female criminology as well as criminal justice processing of female offenders. Also examined are issues concerning female personnel working in police, court and correctional agencies. A female victimological approach is included.

CRIJ 4321 Senior Pro-Seminar

This course is an intensive seminar that allows students to critically examine issues relevant to the police, courts, and correctional systems in the U.S. It is a writing intensive course in which students will apply research skills and submit a literature review. Students also participate in review sessions related to core topical areas in criminal justice.

Prerequisites: Senior standing, and consent of Instructor.

CRIJ 4324 Media and Crime

Analyzes the images of crime, criminals, and the criminal justice system that are presented through major mass and entertainment media in the United States. Students will be able to examine how the media portrays violence, crime and criminals; influences crime policy; and, impacts public perceptions of crime and victimization. (Cross-listed with COMM 4311 and PSYC 4311)

CRIJ 4325 Statistics in Criminal Justice

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to basic concepts and techniques necessary for a preliminary and proficient understanding of criminal justice research. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing and interpreting research findings using a standard statistical software package that includes descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and bivariate analysis.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 3305, and Junior/Senior Standing.

CRIJ 4333 White Collar Crime

This course will focus on the study of contemporary forms of white collar crime and its explanations, theories, and practices along with its investigation, adjudication, and regulation. This course also explores the law of economic and political crimes associated with white collar crime. Students will examine reported cases, case studies, and other materials to investigate the topic of white collar crime - thus gain a foundation for an understanding of this fascinating subject.

CRIJ 4334 Administration of Justice

This course covers contemporary concepts, principles and theories of administration of justice in criminal justice agencies. This course is intended to introduce the student to the views of prominent writers on theories of management and relate them to the field of criminal justice administration. A central intent of this course is to enhance the student’s ability to understand the art and science of organization and administration in criminal justice.

CRIJ 4335 Death Penalty

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the death penalty both in the United States and abroad. Special attention is devoted to the history of the death penalty, Supreme Court decisions, and current statutory laws. Contemporary issues surrounding the death penalty including potential flaws in the administration of justice and alternative sanctions such as life without the possibility of parole are also covered.

CRIJ 4336 Special Needs Offen Corr Inst

This course will explore the variety of offenders with special needs in corrections and how correctional officials have responded to the changing prison population. Topics may include but are not limited to: juvenile inmates, female inmates, chronically and mentally ill inmates, substance addicted veterans, death row inmates under protective custody, incarcerated sex offenders, incarcerated veterans, death row inmates, immigrant inmates and inmate radicalization. Importantly, this course provides a deeper understanding of the concept and practice or corrections in 21st century America.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 1301.

CRIJ 4337 Ethics in Criminal Justice

This course explores the fundamental concept of fairness throughout the criminal justice system. It examines situations, dilemmas, and problems encountered by persons in all criminal justice agencies/organizations. More specifically, it examines ehtical issues in policing, the courts, and in correctional settings. Case scenarios are used to explain and analyze ethical dilemmas. Finally, the course looks at several ethical situations in ciminal justice more in-depth, such as interrogation tactics, prosecutorial misconduct and the death penalty.

CRIJ 4338 Crime&Crime Justice-Disaster

The sudden disruption of the normal flow of human activity in the form of disaster gives rise to both prosocial and antisocial behavior. This course focuses on the later and investigates the crime that occurs in the wake of disasters. This course explores the pre-disaster conditions that may give rise to crime, the extent and type of crime that occurs in the wake of disasters, the special challenges of measuring crime during and after a disaster, effective and ineffective responses to disaster crime, both domestically and internationally, and lastly, lingering questions for a criminology of disaster.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 1301.

CRIJ 4340 Special Issues in Criminal Jus

An intensive examination of special topics of study in criminal justice. May be repeated for credit if topic changes. Topics may include, but are not limited to, race/ethnicity and crime, crime and the media, trafficking in women and children, quantitative research methods, terrorism, current issues in criminal Justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor.

CRIJ 4390 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4490 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4590 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 4601 Criminal Justice Internship

This course is a supervised internship program for pre-service students only. The course requires the completion of 160 hours of internship service to an agency approved by the Internship Coordinator and the department chair. Internship hours must be completed during the semester in which the student is enrolled in the course. Students must attend class and complete course requirements such as assignments, exams, and a research project. The evaluation of student performance is on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite for CRIJ majors: Successful completion of the lower-level CRIJ courses required for the CRIJ major. Must be taken by CRIJ majors during senior year. Evaluation of performance in this course is on CR/NC basis. Restrictions: Students who are employed in the criminal justice field (or related field) are not eligible to take this course. Volunteer hours completed prior to enrolling in this course will not be counted as internship hours for this course.

CRIJ 4690 Undergrad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. The issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 5140 Contemp Iss Criminal Justice

An in-depth focus on selected social, political, and legal issues currently important in criminal justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor. May be repeated when topic changes with permission of CRIJ instructor.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5199 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Criminal Justice thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their thesis advisors. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, successful completion of CRIJ 5398: Thesis I, and permission of the major instructor/advisor.

CRIJ 5240 Contemp Iss Criminal Justice

An in-depth focus on selected social, political, and legal issues currently important in criminal justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor. May be repeated when topic changes with permission of CRIJ instructor.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5301 Adv Smnr in Crij System

This course is designed to build student's critical abilities in analyzing criminal justice policies. This course also examines organizational theories, management and personnel issues including ethics in criminal justice.

CRIJ 5303 Law&Criminal Justice

A study of current societal trends and their impact on legal systems including criminal justice agencies, criminal courts, juvenile courts, mental health courts, and civil courts. The role of the U.S. Constitution and the role and response of both state and federal court systems with respect to these societal trends will be explored.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5305 Sem on Adm of Criminal Just

This course examines organizational theories, models, and typologies for investigating and understanding individual and interpersonal dimensions and operations of criminal justice systems. Leadership and authority patterns, informal and formal communication networks, and diverse variables are examined as they impact upon organizational effectiveness and change, including program evaluation and implementation.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5315 Comparative Crij Systems

A comparative study of criminal justice systems in the United States and selected foreign countries. The comparisons will include countries from some or all of the following areas: Latin America, Europe, Scandinavia, Asia, and the Middle East.

CRIJ 5320 Advanced Methods of Social Res

A description of a variety of research techniques, including theories and frames of reference, the logic of conceptual schemes, and hypothesis development and testing. A variety of sampling plans are contrasted and evaluated, and sampling issues are examined. Critical measurement issues are highlighted, including validity and reliability, how these terms are conceptualized and applied in scaling. Alternative data gathering methods and issues are featured. Several bivariate and multivariate statistical techniques are presented, including relevant computer applications such as SPSS. (Cross-listed with PSCI 5301)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5325 Seminar in Corrections

Examines all dimensions of corrections, including institutional and community correctional organizations. Prisons and jails are featured, together with a variety of institutional and community programs operating to meet the diverse needs of inmates who eventually seek reentry into society. In addition, the types of rehabilitative and reintegrative programming for all types of correctional clients, including probationers, parolees, and divertees are discussed. The functions and operations of all types of correctional organizations are examined, including their historical development and evolution. Also, several important contemporary correctional issues are presented and examined.

Prerequisites: Graduate Status.

CRIJ 5326 Seminar on Police Practices

Examines the historical roots of contemporary policing, including police professionalism, recruitment and training, certification, and police organizations and operations. Focuses upon selected police issues, including misconduct and corruption, codes of conduct, community policing, patrol variations and styles, internal affairs, the police personality, and theories of police behavior. Several important law enforcement issues are examined.

Prerequisites: Graduate status.

CRIJ 5327 Adv Quantitative Mthds in CRIJ

This course is designed to hone both the statistical vocabulary and techniques important to criminal justice system personnel and researchers. This course is designed to introduce graduate students to a wide range of statistical analyses that include univariate, bivariate, multivariate, and inferential techniques. Course materials deal with both the mathematical and practical applications of statistics and evaluating the statistical analysis in the research. This class will also provide students with a working knowledge of SPSS and R.

Prerequisites: Graduate status.

CRIJ 5330 Seminar in Criminological Theo

Critical examination of biological, psychological, sociological, and economic theories of crime. The "traditional theories" of crime are covered; theories upon which the field was originally founded. Also analyzed are the new "integrated" theories along with relevant research data.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5331 Domestic Violence

Provides a sociological overview of the research, theories, and social policies.

CRIJ 5335 Ethics of Criminal Justice

Explores the fundamental concept of fairness throughout the criminal justice system. It examines situations, dilemmas, and problems encountered by persons in all criminal justice agencies and organizations as they go about their day-to-day activities.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5337 Crime and Crij after Disasters

This course will explore the occurrence of crime in the wake of both natural disasters and the criminal justice response to post-disaster crime. It will challenge students to define disaster, to appreciate the methodological difficulties of measuring crime in the wake of disasters, to determine the utility of various theories of crime in explaining post-disaster crime and to understand how the criminal justice response to crime in the wake of disasters is similar to and different from the criminal justice response in non-disaster conditions. This course will be useful for both criminal justice students and practitioners.

Prerequisites: CRIJ 5330.

CRIJ 5338 Offenders with Mental Illness

This course will explore the forces that set deinstitutionalization into motion and the outcome of this process as well as the way in which law enforcement, courts and corrections deal with offenders with mental illness. This course will also explore legal issues that are pertinent to this group and provide a realistic depiction of the concept and practice of criminal justice in 21st century America.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5340 Special Topics in Crim Justice

An in-depth focus on selected social, political, and legal issues currently important in criminal justice. One or two credit arrangement must be approved by the CRIJ faculty advisor. May be repeated when topic changes with permission of CRIJ instructor.

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

CRIJ 5355 Cybercrime

Students will analyze various forms of cybercrime and discern how various theories of crime relate to the various modalities of cybercrime and victimization.

CRIJ 5390 Grad Research in CRIJ

This course enables students to engage in independent research on an issue/topic in criminal justice. This issue/topic is selected by the student, with the advice and approval of the instructor prior to registration. The course may be repeated under a different issue/topic for credit. Prerequiste: Permission of instructor and department chair.

CRIJ 5398 Thesis I

This course is designed to be the first step towards the successful completion of the Criminal Justice thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their major professor. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have a proposal approved by their thesis committee and the required evidence of progress on draft. If a grade of IP is received, the student does not need to enroll again for credit. If the grade of NC is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, successful completion of 24 SCH, and permission of major instructor/advisor.

CRIJ 5399 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Criminal Justice thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their thesis advisors. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, successful completion of CRIJ 5398: Thesis I, and permission of the major instructor/advisor.

CRIJ 5699 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Criminal Justice thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their thesis advisors. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, successful completion of CRIJ 5398: Thesis I, and permission of the major instructor/advisor.

CRIJ 5999 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Criminal Justice thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their thesis advisors. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, successful completion of CRIJ 5398: Thesis I, and permission of the major instructor/advisor.