Communication (COMM)

COMM 1129 News Publication I

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the offical university publications as perscribed under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: COMM 3326 or permission of instructor.

TCCN: COMM 1129

COMM 1130 News Publication II

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the official university publications as perscribed under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: COMM 1129

TCCN: COMM 1130

COMM 1144 Forensics Activity

This course introduces the students to various argumentation techniques. The student will learn basic research skills and methods of cataloging evidence. The student will learn to organize and present ideas in effective communication paradigms. Individual debate and team formats will be demonstrated. College level development of sound arguments and reasoning including the effective incorporation of evidence for the purpose of debate.

TCCN: SPCH 1144

COMM 1145 Forensics II

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics I, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selected students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

TCCN: SPCH 1145

COMM 1300 Media Literacy

Media literacy is defined as the ability to read, analyze, and evaluate communication messages in a variety of communication mediums such as newspapers, TV, radio, on-line, podcasts, and blogging. This course discusses the globalization of mass media, intersection of media and government, and the nature of journalism and the issue of media bias. Students will also explore the social and political implications of various media: how media can shape notions of reality, perpetuate or alter stereotypes, and reinforce or undermine cultural barriers.

COMM 1311 Fundamentals of Comm

The course acquaints students with theories of communication and applications thereof in various social, professional, and educational settings. Students study the core contexts within the discipline including but not limited to: intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, public speaking, and mass media.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 or concurrent enrollment.

COMM 1315 Public Speaking

The course acquaints students with public speaking applications thereof in various social, professional, and educational settings.

Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 or Concurrent Enrollment

COMM 1326 Journalistic Writing

An introduction to basic journalistic techniques, integrating the practices of news gathering, writing and editing through individual and class projects. In addition, this course will explore many of the common critiques made of news reporting. (Formerly COMM 3326)

COMM 2129 News Publication III

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the official university publications as prescribed under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: COMM 1130.

COMM 2130 News Publication IV

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the official university publications as perscribed under faculty supervision. Prerequiste: COMM 2129

COMM 2144 Forensics III

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics II, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selected students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

COMM 2145 Forensics IV

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics III, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selected students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university. Prerequiste: Permission of instructor.

COMM 2235 Debate and Argumentation

Theories and practice in argumentation and debate including analysis, reasoning, organization, evidence, and refutation. This course introduces the students to various arguymentation techniques. The student will learn basic research skills and methods of cataloging evidence. The student will learn to organize and present ideas in effective communication paradigms. Individual debate and team formats will be demonstrated. College level development of sound arguments and reasoning including the effective incorporation of evidence for the purpose of debate.

COMM 2305 Rhetoric of Popular Culture

The course explores the intersection of rhetorical theory and media imagery. Examines the rhetorical significance of multiple popular mediums of cultural exchange including: television programming, music, film, advertisement, and social media.

Prerequisites: COMM 1311 or COMM 1315

COMM 2318 Interpersonal Communication

The course examines the fundamental role of communication in establishing and maintaining personal relationships. By surveying the leading research and theories in interpersonal communication, students explore theoretical perspectives on how individuals enter into, maintain, and terminate relationships. Conceptual perspectives examined will include communicative competence, relational development, interaction process, codes, and context.

Prerequisites: COMM 1311, or COMM 1315, or COMM 1300.

COMM 2324 Practicum in Electronic Media

A studio course for understanding and using communication media technologies. Students will clarify communicative purposes, use appropriate software, as well as plan, produce, edit, and critique compositions. Classes may stress one or more genres, formats, or themes. May be repeated when topic changes with departmental approval.

COMM 2331 Photo I: Intro to Visual Comm

A foundation class in basic photographic tools and techniques used for visual communication. The course examines methods for effective communication using photography. Student work is reviewed and critiqued as to composition, technique, and the ability to communicate the content of the original subject to the reviewer. The 35 mm format and black and white darkroom techniques are required.

COMM 2366 Introduction to Film

Emphasis on the analysis of the visual and aural aspects of selected motion pictures, dramatic aspects of narrative films, and historical growth and sociological effect of film as an art. (Cross-listed with THAR 2366)

COMM 3102 Video Production Lab

Laboratory course to accompany COMM 3202. Must be taken concurrently with COMM 3202.

COMM 3123 Video Editing&Post Prod I Lab

Laboratory course to accompany COMM 3223. Must be taken concurrently with COMM 3223.

COMM 3129 News Publications V

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the official university publications as prescribed under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: COMM 2130.

COMM 3130 News Publication VI

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the offical university publications as prescribed under faculty supervision. Prerequiste: COMM 3129.

COMM 3132 Video Production II Lab

Laboratory course to accompany COMM 3232. Must be taken concurrently with COMM 3232.

COMM 3133 Video Editing&Post Prod Lab

Laboratory course to accompany COMM 3233. Must be taken concurrently with COMM 3233.

COMM 3144 Forensics V

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics IV, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selected students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

COMM 3145 Forensics VI

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics V, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selected students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university. Prerequiste: Permission of instructor.

COMM 3202 Video Production I

Through class and instructor analysis of each student's idea for a short video, the class will cover pre-production details: initial concepts, synopsis, treatment, script, storyboards, shot list, scheduling, location scouting, and cost. Using screenings and analysis of classic scenes, the choices available to the video maker are discussed in depth with focus on subsequent application. Students will work on individual video projects, and on one 6-10 minute final group project. To be taken concurrently with COMM 3102. Course may be repeated once for credit when topic changes.

COMM 3223 Video Editing and Post Prod I

The course emphasizes the theoretical bases of digital production, trends in publicly distributed media, and the use of computers in digital video production. Included are video standards, video editing applications, and an introduction to post-production use of transitions and special effects. Students will write project proposals and shoot their own video to edit. To be taken concurrently with COMM 3123. Course may be repeated once for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite COMM 3202 and COMM 3102 or consent of instructor.

COMM 3232 Video Production II

Through exercises and demonstrations, this course will emphasize the craft, aesthetics and content of production as practiced in emerging and traditional formats. Students will continues to explore the classical narrative style as well as take command of experimental and documentary approaches. Specific topics may include the invisible line of action as it applies to three or more players, disrupting continuity, the music video, avant-garde techniques, recording behavior, and re-creating past events. Screenings and individual projects will be an integral part of this course. May be repeated once for credit. To be taken concurrently with Lab COMM 3132.

Prerequisites: COMM 3202 or consent of instructor.

COMM 3233 Video Editing and Post-Prod II

Focuses on efficiency in process, output choices, and developing an effects library. Topics may include managing the digital post, preparing final scripts, transitions, segmenting, composing, titles, and special effects. Also included are sound design elements, mixing, overdub and foley. Students will propose, shoot, and edit several video projects. May be repeated once for credit. To be taken concurrently with Lab COMM 3133.

Prerequisites: COMM 3223 and COMM 3123 or consent of instructor.

COMM 3300 Intro to Theo Prin of Comm

Beginning study of the nature, problems, and theories of human communication. Examines issues of meaning, relationship, and community within interpersonal, group, and media contexts. Surveys rhetorical, pragmatic, and interpretive perspectives on the communication process.

COMM 3302 Video Production I

Through class and instructor analysis of each student's idea for a short video, the class will cover pre-production details: initial concepts, synopsis, treatment, script, storyboards, shot list scheduling, location scouting, and cost. Using screenings and analysis of classic scenes, the choices available to the videomaker are discussed in depth with focus on subsequent application. Students will work on individual video projects, and on one 6 - 10 minute final group project. Course fee: $40.00.

COMM 3305 Interpersonal Communication

This course examines the fundamental role of communication in establishing and maintaining personal relationships. By surveying the leading research and theories in interpersonal communication, students explore scholarly perspectives on how individuals enter into, maintain, and terminate relationships. Conceptual perspectives examined will include communicative competence, relational development, interaction process, codes, and context. Prerequisite/

Corequisites: COMM 3300.

COMM 3307 Health Communication

In depth study of the central issues, topics, theories, and perspectives relating to health studies, health education, and communication. Surveys rhetorical, pragmatic, and interpretative, and contextual perspectives of communications processes that influence health care practices.

Prerequisites: COMM 1311 or COMM 3300.

COMM 3308 Intercultural Communication

This course provides students with an introductory knowledge base for examining constructions of culture. Course discussions will focus upon intercultural interactions, intercultural barriers, cultural perspectives, cultural adaptions, identity constructions and the greater social, political, philosophical, relational, and economic contexts that shape these concepts.

COMM 3309 Special Topics in Comm

Examines different communications topics including research underpinnings and everyday applications. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 9 SCH in Communication courses or consent of instructor.

COMM 3310 Methods of Inquiry:Quant Rsch

This course will provide an introduction to formulating and answering questions in the field of communication using social science research methods. Course topics will range from developing social scientific research questions and hypotheses to analyses of data.

COMM 3311 Advanced Public Speaking

The course serves to extend and develop presentational skills. It compares forms of reasoning and methods of message rehearsal. Students will write about and discuss their experiences as speakers and audience members. Prerequiste: COMM 1311 or COMM 1315.

COMM 3312 Methods of Inquiry:Qual Rsch

This course introduces students to qualitative research and prepares them in the approaches, skills, and techniques necessary to conduct research using this methodology.

COMM 3320 Teamwork and Communication

Development of communication skills in the context of teams in organizational and professional settings. Students study the nature of effective teamwork, group process, problem solving, and leadership.

COMM 3321 Political Communication

This course will provide an introduction to understanding and answering questions in the field of political communication. This course will investigate how political communication is structured by the media and used by people. The course also will explore how news media functions in a democratic system. Special emphasis will be placed on investigating how the media shapes, and is shaped by, public opinion. Theoretical and empirical research from political science, social psychology, and mass communication will be discussed.

COMM 3322 Public Relations

An introduction to communication between corporations, smaller businesses, non-profit organizations and government and human service agencies and their internal and external publics with particular attention to the uses of media. The course simulates public relations and management situations using case studies.

COMM 3323 Public Relations Campaigns

This course offers practical application of public relations in solving a variety of organizational communication challenges and opportunities. It will integrate theory, techniques and research methods in the planning and execution of public relations projects, programs and/or champaigns for one or more specific organizations. The objectives, planning, staffing, budgeting, implementation, and evaluation of public relations programs will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: COMM 3322.

COMM 3324 Film Studies

This course explores how meaning is structured and perceived in the moving images, film and video. Drawing heavily on a wide array of historical and contemporary examples this course examines the many expressive strategies potentially usable in the creation of moving image art forms: iconography, editing, composition, sound, narrative, discourse, and performance. Topics may include: three visionary filmmakers, three genres, significant film movements, and international cinema. Screening lab required. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. This course is open to all students for credit.

COMM 3325 Mass Communication Processes

A comprehensive survey of the contemporary media of mass communication and an investigation of their influence on social, political, and economic change. This course will also offer material on the origins and historical development of print and broadcast media. (Cross-listed with SOCI 4375).

COMM 3326 Film History

Students will study the major industrial, technological, aesthetic, and cultural developments in motion picture history. Topics may include the invention of motion pictures, the establishment of a film industry and audience, the narrativization of film, developments in the use of cinematic technique, the establishment of national cinemas, the idea of film as art, and technological innovation.

COMM 3327 Media Writing

This course introduces students to some of the different writing techniques and styles used by by print, broadcast and other forms of mass media. Students will develop a multiple range of skills including but not limited to skills in information gathering, interviewing, and organizing data. Course instruction allows for multiple focal points of discussion including but not limited to: News Writing, Broadcast Writing, Print Writing, Copy Writing and Script Writing. May be taken up to three times.

COMM 3328 Adv Journalistic Writing

A continuation of journalistic techniques, integrating the practices of news gathering, writing, editing, and revising through individual projects. Students will be required to produce publishable work of considerable depth and sophistication. Stories, features, and opinion pieces can be based on students' areas of interest and/or major fields. May be taken up to two times.

Prerequisites: COMM 1326 and approval of instructor.

COMM 3329 Fundamentals of Advertising

This course explores the fundamentals of advertising and the basic theories and principles used in developing advertising. Learn how advertisers and agencies develop an advertisement or ad campaign, the visuals and messages to include in the ad, where and when the ad or campaign should run, and why. Topics include typical jobs in advertising and the basic duties associated with each job, advertising history, and ethical considerations. This course will also focus on advertising strategies for Hispanic markets.

COMM 3330 Nonverbal Communication

An introduction to the dynamics of nonverbal behavior through exploration of scholarly research, application of practical theory, and analysis of sociocultural variables to foster a deeper appreciation and greater understanding of nonverbal messages across social contexts. Prerequisite COMM 1311 or COMM 1315.

COMM 3331 Photography II: Intro to Photo

Introduction to the photographic techniques, tools and content issues in visual communication for publications. The emphasis will be on using the photographic medium to communicate ideas, information, and emotions. Color and digital technology will be introduced, as well as an examination of sequential imaging as used in the photographic narrative form the picture story. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite/ Recommendation that student has own single-lens-reflex camera and 35 mm lens.

Corequisites: COMM 2331 or ARTS 2356, or consent of instructor.

COMM 3332 Broadcasting Production I

This course introduces the foundations of broadcasting production, including the production process, the role of crew members, the use of production equipment and facilities, and the production techniques that are used in the creation of television and radio programs. This introductory course requires an in-depth understanding of broadcasting production skills, including pitching, scripting, casting, directing, lighting, staging, and editing.

COMM 3333 Broadcasting Production II

This course requires the application of broadcasting production skills to create quality media projects. This advanced hands-on production course emphasizes the aesthetic creativity, technical proficiency, and the communication competency required to become a broadcasting producer, director, or editor. Course exercises are designed for students to create talk shows, news programming, commercials, and narrative dramas in a multi-camera television studio and on-location settings, and to solve various problems in the production process.

COMM 4129 News Publication VII

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the offical university publications as prescribed under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: COMM 3130

COMM 4130 News Publication VIII

Students are required to work on the staff of at least one of the official university publications as prescribed under faculty supervision. Prerequiste: COMM 4129.

COMM 4144 Forensics VII

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics VI, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selected students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

COMM 4145 Forensics VIII

Continued development of the skills introduced in Forensics VII, this course requires active participation in mock debates and individual performance, and for selexted students, participation in competitive debates as representatives of the university. Prerequiste: Permission of instructor.

COMM 4311 Media and Behavior

This class will examine the ways in which individual consumers, society and various forms of media interact. Outcomes related to advertising effects, criminal behavior, sexuality and racial prejudice will be covered. (Cross-listed with PSYC 4311 and CRIJ 4324).

Prerequisites: ANTH 2346 or COMM 1311 or CRIJ 1301 or PSYC 2301 or SOCI 1301.

COMM 4320 Trends in International Comm

This course is an intensive study of the interdependent relationship between mass and digital communication and culture in an international context. Students will examine conceptual and experiential problems that affect media communication across physical and cultural boundaries including problems of interpreting and evaluating different cultural values, world views, international media conglomerates, cultural imperialism, nationalism, information flow, and the effects of globalization.

COMM 4321 Persuasion

The course examines how purposeful communication changes and strengthens attitudes. It asks: Why are evaluative and proactive messages satisfying, when they are, for both those persuading and being persuaded? Conversely, when (and why) are efforts at persuasion inappropriate, ineffective, or offensive? The course illustrates how these differences can be understood in theory and practice.

COMM 4323 Communication Law

An overview and analysis of common legal issues in public communication. May include considerations relevant to print journalism, namely libel, invasion of privacy, censorship, questionable news gathering techniques and other First Amendment topics, as well as current legal problems in the television and radio broadcast industries.

Prerequisites: Six hours of COMM.

COMM 4324 Comparative Journalism

Students will be engaged in a comprehensive study of the state of Latin American journalism practices, mainstream American journalism practices and ethnic Hispanic-oriented media in the United States. The focus is on traditional/ new media outlets and news wires during election periods as well as journalistic freedoms and censorship, presidential elections, political news and advertisements, and international news reporting. This course is writing and research intensive and will primarily be taught in English though students will be reading media examples written in Spanish. Prerequisite SPAN 3300 or permission of the instructor.

COMM 4325 Organizational Communication

Overview of research and theory in organizational communication. Examines internal processes of socialization, group decision-making and influence as well as external communication such as public relations, issue management and corporate advocacy. Emphasis on analysis or organizational communication problems.

COMM 4330 Special Issues in Comm

Course provides intensive study of diverse and relevant specialized subjects and topics in communication. Subjects may focus on various trends, methodologies, research, measurements, and analysis within the field. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

COMM 4340 Communication Ethics

The course asks how we make ethical judgements about communication practices: How do we recognize lies and decide when lying might be ethical? What other breaches of civility do we shun in the ways people speak and listen? What would be a reasonable ethic for professional and personal communication? How can we ethically communicate with people of other cultures?

COMM 4345 Advanced UG Research

This class is designed to offer students with a specific interest in developing social scientific and humanistic research skills in communication studies the opportunity to work with one or more Communication faculty members on directed research projects. The primary instructional activity in this course will be individualized research opportunities provided by faculty members. Every student will work with a single faculty mentor to help gain exposure to research methods through active involvement in ongoing research projects.

Prerequisites: COMM 3310 or 3312, and Junior or Senior Standing.

COMM 4350 Internship

Application of concepts through participation in communities, institutions, agencies, schools, or businesses. Supervision by faculty and sponsoring organizations. Includes interpretive journal, summary paper and presentation. Those students enrolled in the Communication/Spanish degree will intern at Spanish-speaking organizations. Evaluation of performance in this course is on CR/NC basis.

Prerequisites: A completed and approved Internship Agreement.

COMM 4360 Comm Theory&Practice

Synthesis and integration of theory with communication practices and problems that students have encountered through work and life experiences. Students will learn how theory applies to our everyday life and helps us become more competent communicators. Culmination of this course is a senior thesis paper for senior portfolio.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing or consent of instructor

COMM 5199 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Communication thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their major professor. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, COMM 5398: Thesis I, and permission of major instructor/advisor.

COMM 5301 Communication Theories

The course provides a survey and critical examination of the main theoretical approaches in the fields of mass, international and organizational communication. The course is intended to acquaint students with the conceptual foundations and epistemological bases of the three basic areas available in the graduate program in communication.

COMM 5302 Quant Research Methods in Comm

This course introduces the sociological and behavioristic approaches to communication research It will examine the fundamental epistemologies, design, methods, and data analysis in quantitative communication research. Students will learn, demonstrate and apply course concepts by analyzing texts and conducting research.

COMM 5303 Qualitative Rsrch Mthds inComm

This course introduces the humanistic approaches to communication research. It will examine the fundamental epistemologies, design, methods, and data analysis in communication research. The goal is for students to learn and apply course concepts by analyzing texts and conducting research projects.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

COMM 5310 Media, Cult&Ident US-MX Border

This course critically examines the relationship between mass media, culture, and society in the context of the Mexican and United States border. It looks at the impact of the border culture on media, particularly focusing on the historical and political economic influences on media organizations. It will also study the impact of media on border society and media's role in the reinforcement and transformation of a border cultural identity.

COMM 5311 Border Journalism

The course focuses on the main theoretical, social and technical aspects of news production and reporting in the border region between Mexico and the United States. It discusses and analyzes the peculiarities and challenges the geographical, political and cultural context impose on the topics, processed, values and routines of newsgathering and in the patterns of news consumption by residents on both sides of the border.

COMM 5312 Mexican & Latino Cinema

Course offers a crticial examination of cinema from Mexico and throughout Latin America relating to Latino cultural experiences. Emphasis will be on those films that educate viewers about Latino encounters with majority and minority cultures within Latin America. The goal of the course is to analyze these films as works of art as relevant films that stand on their own in film history and contemporary cinema and to discuss these films as cultural, historical, political, and economic products that characterize and reveal aspects, sensibilities and points of view from the represented nations and regions.

COMM 5313 Ethno & Doc Prod in Border Rgn

This course will develop students’ critical skills of film analysis through the practical application and experience of creating a film and manipulating digital media and equipment. The course will introduce and prepare students to use digital media as a tool in research, and as a method of presenting research outcomes. While the aims are primarily to enable students to acquire and apply practical skills, by doing so this course contributes to their formation as ethnographers in the Border region. It demystifies the process of digital filmmaking, and opens new ways of reading and understanding visual ethnographies (particularly documentary and ethnographic film).

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

COMM 5320 Media Flows & Audiences

The course explores the exchange of audiovisual media flows and the patterns of consumption and appropriation of foreign and national media contents in the American continent. It discusses the impact of international treaties and historical, political and economic relationships between countries in the Americas have had in the Inter-American supply and consumption of media products.

COMM 5321 Political Comm in a Comp Persp

The course analyzes the relevance of political communication in an increasingly interconnected and interdependent American Hemisphere, discussing the impact of media on elections, on governments and on the development of foreign policy in the United States, Canada and Latin America. The course studies the spread of U.S. political marketing and political communication in Latin American countries and the consequences and challenges posed in them by the new fundamental role played by media in the political arena.

COMM 5329 Topics: Border & Latin America

This course provides intensive study of diverse and relevant specialized subjects and topics within the study of Latin America, Latino (a), and Border Media Studies. Course allows graduate students to focus on contemporary and pressing topics, trends, methodologies, research, measurements, and analysis within the field. Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes. Students will be expected to critically read and analyze texts related to subject area as well as develop original research projects.

COMM 5330 Organizational Communication

This course introduces and applies theoretical and research-based literature in organizational communication. The goal is for students to learn and apply the underpinnings of organizational communication literature to organizational situations by critically reading and analyzing texts and developing research projects.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

COMM 5331 Intercultural Training in Org

This course focuses on intercultural understanding and that cultural competence skill development is increasingly important across industries in our global communities. Global workforces are rich with multicultural, multi-ethnic, and multi lingual diversity. Inherent in this diversity is a network of cultural traditions, values, and communication styles. Thus, there is a need for intercultural and diversity training in the corporate world, the nonprofit world, and in education and communication, training. Management experts need to gain a deeper understanding of these diverse values and communication styles in order to work effectively with and train colleagues and clients. This course will illustrate intercultural concepts and processes that require training, including culture shock and adaptation, cultural dialectics, expatriate/repatriation, self-reflexivity, etc. You will practice the tools and skills you need to train on these concepts, including conducting needs assessments, defining learning outcomes, and designing and facilitating intercultural training.

COMM 5332 Managing Org Conflict

This course examines conflict by recognizing that it is a reoccurring part of life in business, government, and nonprofit organizations. It is a product of human existence and diversity in an interrelated society. The costs associated with these conflicts are well documented. Organizations are increasingly recognizing that conflict does not have to carry costly financial and interpersonal burdens and can, in fact, serve as a productive change agent. Students in this course explore the nature and sources of organizational conflict and facilitate development of practical skills to recognize and manage workplace conflict using case studies, interactive lectures, simulations, and field research. Students are introduced to the concept of conflict coaching. This course is well-suited for managers and leaders in any profession who want to increase their interpersonal capability and enhance their value in organizations.

COMM 5333 Org. Culture, Climate & Comm

This course examines the relationship between organizational culture and communication and discusses the components of a supportive communication climate. It will also examine case studies and academic research to undertake issues and complications relevant to sustaining and enriching supportive communication practices. The goal is for students to learn, demonstrate, and apply course concepts by analyzing academic literature and conducting research projects.

COMM 5334 Advertising

This course considers advertising theory and practice and reviews application of theory to advertising, promotion, and media selection strategies. The course requires development of an advertising plan, media selection rationales, evaluation of selected campaigns, and use of advetising media research techniques.

COMM 5335 Group/Team Dynamics

This course focuses on the notion that effective group/team processes are invaluable to every organization. Ensuring productive and satisfying group interactional outcomes in organizational, professional and personal settings can be difficult. Focusing upon theory, application and practice of small group processes- including development of group dynamics, group leadership and teams - students incorporate new skills, enhance productivity, and reduce barriers to effective communication in groups and teams.

COMM 5336 Ethical Issues in Org

The course examines ethical questions that directly affect how organizations communicate and what they choose to relay and omit to their various audiences. Organizational women and men are compelled to make ethical decisions when they communicate. Proponents of strategic ambiguity in and for organizations have been confronted and countered by other theorists who reject ambiguity as a euphemism for lying. Analyzes cases and academic studies that reflect how ethical and unethical communication affected the fortunes of organizations. Analyzes and evaluates the practical values of ethical yardsticks.

COMM 5337 Leadership Communication

The course will use a variety of learning methods. In the threaded discussion area, course concepts will be discussed and students will be invited to offer their own experiences, personal and professional backgrounds, and points of view. Since leadership is enacted through communication, the focus on concepts such as persuasion and charisma will be highlighted. Critical thinking will be developed through class discussion and assignments that require "out of the box" thinking. Logical thinking and critical analysis are essential, this course attempts to develop these skills through the examination and application of organizational, persuasion, interpersonal and mass communication theories. The scientific method will be addressed through testing and retesting of theoretical models to assess validity and reliability.

COMM 5339 Topics: Organizational Comm

The course will introduce graduate students to contemporary and pressing topics within the study of the organizational communications, including trends, methodologies, and research methods. Students will be expected to critically read and analyze texts related to the subject area as well as develop original research projects.

COMM 5398 Thesis I

This course is designed to be the first step towards the successful completion of the Communication thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their major professor. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have a proposal approved by their thesis committee and the required evidence of progress on a draft. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, successful completion of 24 SCH, and permission of major instructor/advisor.

COMM 5399 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Communication thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their major professor. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, COMM 5398: Thesis I, and permission of major instructor/advisor.

COMM 5699 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Communication thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their major professor. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, COMM 5398: Thesis I, and permission of major instructor/advisor.

COMM 5999 Thesis II

This course is designed to be the final step towards the successful completion of the Communication thesis. Students schedule the coursework in consultation with their major professor. Evaluation of performance is CR/NC. Students will receive credit for the class when they have successfully written and defended their thesis to their thesis committee. If the grade of IP is received, the student must enroll again for credit.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, COMM 5398: Thesis I, and permission of major instructor/advisor.